lesion

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lesion

injury or loss. In the civil law jurisdictions the word is often used in the context of an ‘unfair’ loss, as where an adult takes advantage of a minor or someone purchases something for much less than it's worth.

LESION, contracts. In the civil law this term is used to signify the injury suffered, in consequence of inequality of situation, by one who does not receive a full equivalent for what he gives in a commutative contract.
     2. The remedy given for this injury, is founded on its being the effect of implied error or imposition; for in every commutative contract, equivalents are supposed to be given and received. Louis. Code, 1854. Persons of full age, however, are not allowed in point of law to object to their agreements as being injurious, unless the injury be excessive. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 4. But minors are admitted to restitution, not only against any excessive inequality, but against any inequality whatever. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 5; Louis. Code, art. 1858.
     3. Courts of chancery relieve upon terms of redemption and set aside contracts entered into by expectant heirs dealing for their expectancies, on the ground of mere inadequacy of price. 1 Vern. 167; 2 Cox, 80; 2 Cas. in Ch. 136; 1 Vern. 141; 2 Vern. 121; 2 Freem. 111; 2 Vent. 359; 2 Vern. 14; 2 Rep. in Ch. 396; 1 P. W. 312; 1 Bro. C. C. 7; 3 P. Wms. 393, n.; 2 Atk. 133; 2 Ves. 125; 1 Atk. 301; 1 Wils. 286; 1 Wils. 320; 1 Bro. P. 6. ed. Toml. 198; 1 Bro. C. C. 1; 16 Ves. 512; Sugd. on Vend. 231, n. k.; 1 Ball & B. 330; Wightw. 25; 3 Ves. & Bea. 117; 2 Swanst. R. 147, n.; Fonb. notes to the Treatise of Equity, B, 1, c. 2, s. 9. A contract cannot stand where the party has availed himself of a confidential situation, in order to obtain some selfish advantage. Note to Crowe v. Ballard. 1 Ves. jun. 125; 1 Hov. Supp. 66, 7. Note to Wharton v. May. 5 Ves. 27; 1 Hov. Supp. 378. See Catching bargain; Fraud; Sale.

References in periodicals archive ?
Vasculitis mimics: cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions. Am J Med Sci.
It is essentially a destructive lesion, producing a radiolucent area with either a relatively smooth or a ragged border and sometimes showing faint trabecu-lae.
The imaging demonstrated disseminated disease with a destructive lesion of the right ilium and abnormal soft tissue in the bilateral perinephric space.
This clinical entity is rare, but it should be strongly suspected in a patient who presents with a destructive lesion of the vertebra and a retropharyngeal mass that extends across the midline.
CT of the temporal bones identified a destructive lesion involving the left mastoid, petrous apex, and cerebellopontine angle.
Areview of his original computed tomography (CT) scan (figure) revealed the presence of a large, destructive lesion that involved the sinonasal area and extended into the anterior cranial fossa, a significant degree of associated vasogenic edema in the adjacent frontal lobes of the brain, and signs of hemorrhage.
Radiographic images will often show a destructive lesion with tooth displacement, but they are nonspecific.
We also review the pathophysiology and differential diagnosis of a cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion (CIMDL), and we discuss alternatives to the use of cocaine in rhinologic practice.
Early destructive lesions in the developing brain: clinical and electrographic correlates.
Cocaine induced midline destructive lesions. Rhinology 2014;52:104-11.
Caption: Figure 1: Axial (a) and coronal (b) HRCT images reveal extensive permeative destructive lesions involving both temporal bones (white asterisks).
Such destructive lesions were first described by Cooper and Travers [2] in 1818, but GCTB was not distinguished from other tumors of bone until 1940 [3].