reversal

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reversal

n. the decision of a court of appeal ruling that the judgment of a lower court was incorrect and is reversed. The result is that the lower court which tried the case is instructed to dismiss the original action, retry the case, or is ordered to change its judgment. Examples: a court which denied a petition for writ of mandate is ordered to issue the writ. A lower court which gave judgment with no evidence of damages is ordered to dismiss.

reversal

noun abolishment, abolition, about-face, annulment, backslide, cancellation, change, change of mind, check, countermandment, counterorder, disavowal, invalidation, inversion, nonapproval, nullification, overriding, overruling, overthrowing, rebuff, rebuke, recantation, renouncement, renunciation, repeal, repudiation, rescission, retraction, reversion, revocation, revokement, turnabout, undoing, voidance, voiding
Associated concepts: reversal of a lower court's decision
See also: annulment, cancellation, countermand, defeasance, discharge, negation, nollo prosequi, reconversion, recrudescence, relapse, repudiation, rescision, retraction, reversion, revocation

REVERSAL, international law. First. A declaration by which a sovereign promises that he will observe a certain order, or certain conditions, which have been once established, notwithstanding any changes that may happen to cause a deviation therefrom; as, for example, when the French court, consented for the first time, in 1745, to grant to Elizabeth, the Czarina of Russia, the title of empress, exacted as a reversal, a declaration purporting that the assumption of the title of an imperial government, by Russia, should not derogate from the rank which France had held towards her. Secondly. Those letters are also termed reversals, Litterae Reversales, by which a sovereign declares that, by a particular act of his, he does not mean to prejudice a third power. Of this we have an example in history: formerly, the emperor of Germany, whose coronation, according to the golden ball, ought to have been solemnized at Aix-la-Chapelle, gave to that city when he was crowned elsewhere, reversals, by which he declared that such coronation took place without prejudice to its rights, and without drawing any consequences therefrom for the future.

References in periodicals archive ?
Then, after a five-week period of detraining coinciding with the Christmas holidays, the EG participants completed another stretching intervention program twice a week for eleven weeks (second semester).
The training protocol adopted a randomized crossover design, which was separated by a 16-week detraining period.
investigated the training and detraining effects of EMST on respiratory function and voluntary cough in participants with MS with mild to moderate disability and age- and sex-matched healthy individuals [22].
25) revealed that resistance training induced improvements in HRR were maintained after 2 weeks of detraining in young black men but returned to baseline in the white men.
Detraining results in a gradual but fairly rapid loss of muscle mitochondrial content.
The length of time is variable, but detraining seems to begin within 48-72 hours of cessation of activity and proceeds with decreased physiologic function at 1% per day.
The following strategies for fighting detraining during travel periods come from certified personal trainer Kristal Richardson, a professional bodybuilder who spends a great deal of time on the road.
Early long-term changes of equine skeletal muscle in response to endurance training and detraining.
It was more of a tradition there, when railroad passenger services were at their height, that long-distance train passengers were shepherded and controlled - enticed to spend at the many lounge shops - before being allowed to descend on to the platform to join the waiting train (after it had arrived and unloaded detraining passengers).
Little is known about how long the effects persist with detraining or whether the duration of benefit is effected by training intensity or amount.
These findings are consistent with an investigation examining long-term outcomes of progressive resistance exercise in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Ortega et al 2002), and general investigations of detraining (Mujika and Padilla 2001), suggesting that ongoing exercise performance is required to maintain gains.