deviation

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deviation

departure from the route that a carrier has expressly or impliedly agreed to follow. Deviation without reasonable justification (e.g. to save life or property) amounts to a repudiation of the contract by the carrier (see COMMON CARRIER).

DEVIATION, insurance, contracts. A voluntary departure, without necessity, or any reasonable cause, from the regular and usual course of the voyage insured.
     2. From the moment this happens, the voyage is changed, the contract determined, and the insurer discharged from all subsequent responsibility. By the contract, the insurer only runs the risk of the contract agreed upon, and no other; and it is, therefore, a condition implied in the policy, that the ship shall proceed to her port of destination by the. shortest and safest course, and on no account to deviate from that course, but in cases of necessity. 1 Mood. & Rob. 60; 17 Ves. 364; 3 Bing. 637; 12 East, 578.
     3. The effect of a deviation is not to vitiate or avoid the policy, but only to determine the liability of the underwriters from the time of the deviation. If, therefore, the ship or goods, after the voyage has commenced, receive damage, then the ship deviates, and afterwards a loss happen, there, though the insurer is discharged from the time of the deviation, and is not answerable for the subsequent loss, yet he is bound to make good the damage sustained previous to the deviation. 2 Lord Raym. 842 2 Salk. 444.
     4. But though he is thus discharged from subsequent responsibility, he is entitled to retain the whole premium. Dougl. 271; 1 Marsh. Ins. 183; Park. Ins. 294. See 2 Phil. Ev. 60, n. (b) where the American cases are cited.
     5. What amounts to a deviation is not easily defined, but a departure from the usual course of the voyage, or remaining at places where the ship is authorized to touch, longer than necessary, or doing there what the insured is not authorized to do; as, if the ship have merely liberty to touch at a point, and the insured stay there to trade, or break bulk, it is a deviation. 4 Dall. 274 1 Peters' C. C. R. 104; Marsh. Ins. B. 1, c. 6, s. 2. By the course of the voyage is not meant the shortest course the ship can take from her port of departure to her port of destination, but the regular and customary track, if such there be, which long us usage has proved to be the safest and most convenient. 1 Marsh. Ins. 185. See 3 Johns. Cas. 352; 7 T. R. 162.
     6. A deviation that will discharge the insurer, must be a voluntary departure from the usual course of the voyage insured, and not warranted by any necessity. If a deviation can be justified by necessity, it will not affect the contract; and necessity will justify a deviation, though it proceed from a cause not insured against. The cases of necessity which are most frequently adduced to justify a departure from the direct or usual course of the voyage, are, 1st. Stress of weather. 2d. The want of necessary repairs. 3d. Joining convoy. 4th. Succouring ships in distress. 5th. Avoiding capture or detention. 6th. Sickness of the master or mariner. 7th. Mutiny of the crew. See Park, Ins. c. 17; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 1187, et seq.; 2 John. Cas. 296; 11 Johns. R. 241; Pet. C. C. R. 98; 2 Johns. Rep. 89; 14 Johns. R. 315; 2 Johns. R. 138; 9 Johns. R. 192; 8 Johns. Rep. 491; 13 Mass. 68 13 Mass. 539; Id. 118; 14 Mass. 12 1 Johns. Cas. 313; 11 Johns. R. 241; 3 Johns. R. 352; 10 Johns. R. 83; 1 Johns. R. 301; 9 Mass. 436, 447; 3 Binn. 457 7 Mass. 349; 5 Mass. 1; 8 Mass. 308 6 Mass. 102 121 6 Mass. 122 7 Cranch, 26; Id. 487; 3 Wheat. 159 7 Mass. 365; 10 Mass. 21 Id. 347 7 Johns. Rep. 864; 3 Johns. R. 352; 4 Dall. R. 274 5 Binn. 403; 2 Serg. & Raw. 309; 2 Cranch, 240.

DEVIATION, contracts. When a plan has been adopted for a building, and in the progress of the work a change has been made from the original plan, the change is called a deviation.
     2. When the contract is to build a house according to the original plan, and a deviation takes place, the contract shall be traced as far as possible, and the additions, if any have been made, shall be paid for according to the usual rate of charging. 3 Barn. & Ald. 47; and see 1 Ves. jr. 60; 10 Ves. jr. 306; 14 Ves. 413; 13 Ves. 73; Id. 81 6 Johns. Ch. R. 38; 3 Cranch, 270; 5 Cranch, 262; 3 Ves. 693; 7 Ves. 274; Chit. Contr. 168; 9 Pick. 298.
     3. The Civil Code of Louisiana, art. 2734, provides, that when an architect or other workman has undertaken the building of a house by the job, according to a plot agreed on between him and the owner of the ground, he cannot claim an increase of the price agreed on, on the plea of the original plot having been changed and extended, unless he can prove that such changes have been made in compliance with the wishes of the proprietor.

References in periodicals archive ?
which converts two independent (0, 1)-uniform deviates, U, U' into a pair X, Y of independent standard normal variables.
This paper shows that the wage-employment path may be steeper when both parties have the power to deviate than when the firm alone can deviate.
For example, he foresees that allowing gay marriage might not be an unmixed blessing, since it could put pressure on all "deviates" to be monogamous, while outraging heterosexuals.
So, with this information you can plan to deviate only 36 miles instead of the 50.
The author has organized the main body of his text in eight chapters devoted to the origins of the FBI surveillance of gays, Second World War gay baiting and the FBI investigations of Sumner Welles, David Walsh, and Philip Faymonville, the Lavender Scare and the FBI Sex Deviates Program and files, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
"We're going to need to deviate right." My scope showed nothing in his path, but, then again, our radars only show precipitation.
Scientists say the comet's ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 deviates from the ratio found in other solar system matter.
By measuring the distortion precisely, physicists can determine whether the strength of the weak nuclear force deviates at all from the strength predicted by the standard model.
Based on this analysis, unless the trust's or estate's governing instrument provides otherwise (or applicable local law deviates from the RUPIA with respect to RIC distributions), short-term capital gain distributions from a RIC to a trust or estate should retain their character as capital gain and thus be allocated to corpus.
With her two-minute soundless loop of photographic stills recorded on a DVD and projected onto the wall, Katrin Freisager creates her own painting-related genre out of the photographic image: a group portrait that deviates from itself.
Harries rejects Koyrd's radical position (and deviates a bit from Duhem's neo-scholasticism) and turns rather to the theological and mystical speculations of Cusanus as the key and "conceptual link" between ancient ideas and modern science.
Donohue's quarrel with the ACLU is not that it deviates from some dispassionate norm that he embraces.