devisee


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devisee

n. a person who receives a gift of real property by a will. The distinction between gifts of real property and personal property are actually blurred, so terms like beneficiary or legatee cover those receiving any gift by a will.

devisee

noun acceptor, beneficiary, donee, grantee, heir, inheritor, legatee, recipient, successor, transferee
See also: donee, feoffee, grantee, heir, legatee, payee, recipient, transferee

DEVISEE. A person to whom a devise has been made.
     2. All persons who are in rerum natura, and even embryos, may be devisees, unless excepted by some positive law. In general, he who can acquire property by his labor and industry, may receive a devise. C. & N. 353.

References in periodicals archive ?
Section 1-201(20) defines that an "[i]nterested person includes heirs, devisees, children, spouses, creditors, beneficiaries and any others having a property right in or claim against a trust estate or the estate of a decedent.
136) The last will, later in 1947, while making certain revisions, continued to name Ripton College as the residual devisee.
commonly the patient's heirs or devisees, and the more money spent
The adapted trust for reversionary beneficiaries, subject to the trustee's power of distribution, avoids the complete failure of the decedent's purpose under traditional doctrine, which has required the devisee to hold immediately on the resulting trust.
1930) (holding that a bequest conditioned partly upon the devisee remaining single was not obnoxious to the rule against restraints on marriage).
Austrian Roth & Partners, a real estate consultancy which has acted in place of the owner ("In Loco Domini") for offshore investors, is expanding its capability to provide the same services to individuals, families, trustees, devisees and non-profit organizations.
With Fred's sister Anne having predeceased, this left Helen Mann, Fred's only sibling to survive him, as the sole contingent devisee under the will.
ought not to be deemed to be repealed, unless the language of a statute be clear and explicit for this purpose" (Fairfax's Devisee v.
Hugh Munro of the same place, as a devisee in the will of Captain John Munro (his grandfather).
146) A testator typically uses precatory language to convey his or her wish that the devisee use the bequeathed property to benefit someone or some entity.
Property specifically or demonstratively devised by the decedent's will to any devisee shall not be included in exempt property.