devolution

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devolution

n. the transfer of rights, powers, or an office (public or private) from one person or government to another. (See: devolve)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

devolution

1 the transmission ofan interest in property from one person to another by operation of law.
2 in constitutional law, the giving of a degree of power, functional, sectional or geographic, to an inferior body. A recent legal model appeared in the Scotland Act 1998.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

DEVOLUTION, eccl. law. The transfer, by forfeiture, of a right and power which a person has to another, on account of some act or negligence of the person who is vested with such right or power: for example, when a person has the right of preseptation, and he does not present within the time prescribed, the right devolves on his next immediate superior. Ayl. Par. 331.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
[6] Drag queens are obviously strong candidates for the demonstration of a devolutionary masculinity, having very visibly embraced a feminised marginality.
Unfortunately, the cultural, political, and legal environment that currently envelops scientific research has become so group conscious and risk averse that we may have already "crossed the Rubicon"; in other words, the devolutionary forces that threaten the foundations of scientific culture in the United States may have already taken their toll.
One of these 'devolutionary fantasies', as Paul Barker calls them, was written by Alastair Burner and Norman Macrae, 40 years ago in The Economist for 8 December 1962.
In December, 1999, MLAs - who sit only two days a week in Assembly session - voted themselves an pounds 8,500 pay increase, bringing them broadly in line with salaries paid to devolutionary parliamentarians in Scotland and Wales.
The chapter that follows, Chapter Seven, "Reconstructing Borneo's Culture History," examines a variety of hypotheses that have been advanced to account for the origin of hunter-gatherers in Borneo, taking issue in particular with revisionist, and especially devolutionary, explanations.
Indeed, Russia and the West opposed the breakup of Bosnia, where the accession of Serb and Croatian minorities to Serbia and Croatia would otherwise make considerable sense, precisely because they wanted to dampen such devolutionary tendencies.
Stephen McBride and Peter Stoyko describe an apparent exception to this devolutionary trend in the final chapter, on the federal government's response to the negative consequences of the demise of Fordism-Keynesianism in Canada that has been disproportionately visited upon youth.
Smadja, who had not had to defend Switzer land's devolutionary democracy often, found himself doing just that after days of tumultuous clashes at one of the most heated Davos gatherings since the world's business and political elite first began congregating in this remote comer in 1971.
The North American Free Trade Agreement specifically and the relationship with the United States more generally nudged both presidents Carlos Salinas and Ernesto Zedillo toward the devolutionary option (albeit, in different modes).
And that's the second point, which is that this issue has for all intents and purposes been captured by the devolutionary forces of American politics, who treat all matters relating to education as sacred states' rights turf.
Although the book covers an impressive sweep of time, Lofgren cautions against the sort of longue-duree catch-all narrative that "fall[s] into evolutionary or devolutionary traps, like 'from the Grand Tour to Europe on $5 a day.'"