devolution

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devolution

n. the transfer of rights, powers, or an office (public or private) from one person or government to another. (See: devolve)

devolution

1 the transmission ofan interest in property from one person to another by operation of law.
2 in constitutional law, the giving of a degree of power, functional, sectional or geographic, to an inferior body. A recent legal model appeared in the Scotland Act 1998.

DEVOLUTION, eccl. law. The transfer, by forfeiture, of a right and power which a person has to another, on account of some act or negligence of the person who is vested with such right or power: for example, when a person has the right of preseptation, and he does not present within the time prescribed, the right devolves on his next immediate superior. Ayl. Par. 331.

References in periodicals archive ?
And devolutionists' idyllic view of the localities - lean, well-managed, and close to the people - is far from the reality.
So for him to now try to portray himself as a 'committed devolutionist', to further his own career within the Labour Party, is farcical.
9 million voters, higher than some recent local elections, denying devolutionists any claim that it was unrepresentative.
And the party will co-operate with the Scotland Forward devolutionists in order to secure a positive turn-out.
As one who lived and worked in North Wales for many years-until quite recently, I fear that the insular approach shown by the Devolutionists can only be off putting to many of those national ie British and international organisations traditionally responsible for the ingloriously required investments in industrial and commercial products/activities so vital for the very urgent job creation required nationwide.
TONY Lewis (Viewpoints, Wednesday May 7) was correct when he summed up this all-engulfing monster that devolutionists have created.
WELL, you Devolutionists, (all 0.6% of you) I hope you are happy and content when you look at what you have elected and created down at Cardiff Bay - an all-engulfing monster.
Privately, however, devolutionists are relieved as they had braced themselves for an outright recommendation to vote `no'.
THE devolutionists have finally got what they wanted.
He writes: "The challenge now facing devolutionists is that unless the way those powers are used is sharpened up there is a risk that support for giving some powers back to Westminster may grow."
No amount of nation-building is going to alter that, whatever ardent devolutionists might wish.
In both Scotland and Wales it is hopelessly split between unionists on the one hand and devolutionists on the other.