devolution

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devolution

n. the transfer of rights, powers, or an office (public or private) from one person or government to another. (See: devolve)

devolution

1 the transmission ofan interest in property from one person to another by operation of law.
2 in constitutional law, the giving of a degree of power, functional, sectional or geographic, to an inferior body. A recent legal model appeared in the Scotland Act 1998.

DEVOLUTION, eccl. law. The transfer, by forfeiture, of a right and power which a person has to another, on account of some act or negligence of the person who is vested with such right or power: for example, when a person has the right of preseptation, and he does not present within the time prescribed, the right devolves on his next immediate superior. Ayl. Par. 331.

References in periodicals archive ?
The problem is that most state legislatures - where devolutionists want many of the most important decisions to be made - are far more vulnerable than the federal government to well-monied special interests.
But, for reasons that are difficult to understand among a crowd that loves the word efficiency," the devolutionists seem convinced that it's almost always better to let 50 state governments deal with national problems.
In fact, if the devolutionists get their way, there will be many, many more than 50 monkeys.
Law enforcement, of course, is not the only area where this devolutionist myth - that local officials, as a rule, are better managers - falls down.
If the referendum on greater powers for our Assembly fails because large numbers of people are not watching Welsh television then those devolutionists, both nationalist and unionist, who have failed to address this problem will have no right to complain.
The dilemma is do they pick a "suit" who appeals to the Cardiff elite, Welsh business and the party's devolutionists or do they turn to an out-and-out socialist who'll appeal to traditional Labour voters by returning to principles and policies that have held the party in stead for decades?
It is a book which will not please zealous Scottish national separatists, political or cultural, for the author comes across as a fairly conservative patriotic but unionist Scot with devolutionist tendencies.