Diplomacy

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DIPLOMACY., The science which treats of the relations and interests of nations with nations.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
China also actively seeks cooperation against terrorism by cooperating with other countries such as the United States, India, Russia, Pakistan, and so on," he says in his article for The Diplomatist.
Peter Parker, M.D.: Missionary, Physician, and Diplomatist; The Father of Medical Missions and Founder of the Ophthahnic Hospital in Canton (Boston: Congregational Sunday School & Publishing Society, 1896).
I forgive him his inordinate dulness, for he was not a diplomatist and it was not his business to lie, but he might once in a way have forgotten Mount Vernon."
At the age of 38 he was unemployed, a college dropout and former cook, salesman, diplomatist and farmer.
As Harold Nicolson wrote in his classic book Diplomacy, first published in 1939, "My own practical experience, and the years of study which I have devoted to this subject, have left me with the profound conviction that 'moral' diplomacy is ultimately the most effective, and that 'immoral' diplomacy defeats its own purposes." In his chapter on the "Ideal Diplomatist," Nicolson says that the first virtue of the ideal diplomat is truthfulness.
However, as Chris Brown has rightly pointed out, it is difficult to discuss justice with classical realists because "they set up the problem in such a way that the responsibility of the diplomatist is primarily to the polity which he or she represents." Chris Brown, "Theories of International Justice," British Journal of Political Science 27 (April 1997): 276.
Eliot, the diplomatist and historian Harold Nicolson.An epigraph from Herman Melville turns up early in Holbrooke's remarkable chronicle of his experience in the Balkans
Nicolson undescores that an ideal diplomatist should be truthful, accurate, calm, patient, good tempered, modest and loyal.
His concluding thought about America's role in the peace process, that "although we remain vital to peacemaking, we can't drive the train as much as I once believed," is a fitting one and captures the essence of the author--a thoughtful observer, seasoned analyst, veteran diplomatist, readable scholar, and all-around mensch.
"I must plead as guilty as any of escaping into immediate busywork to keep from the far harder task of peering into a dim future, which, of course, should be one of a diplomatist's main tasks."
Peter Parker, D.D.: Missionary, Physician and Diplomatist, the Father of Medical Missions and Founder of the Opthalmic Hospital in Canton (Boston, 1896), 41.

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