Direct

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Direct

As a verb, to point to; guide; order; command; instruct. To advise; suggest; request. As an adjective, immediate; proximate; by the shortest course; without circuity; operating by an immediate connection or relation, instead of operating through an intermediary; the opposite of indirect. In the usual or regular course or order, as distinguished from that which diverts, interrupts, or opposes. The opposite of cross, contrary, collateral, or remote. Without any intervening medium, agency, or influence; unconditional.

DIRECT. Straight forward; not collateral.
     2. The direct line of descents for example, is formed by a series of degrees between persons who descend one from another. Civ. Code of Lo. art. 886.

EVIDENCE, DIRECT. That which applies immediately to the fadum probandum, without any intervening process; as, if A testifies he saw B inflict a mortal wound on C, of which he, instantly died. 1 Greenl. Ev. Sec. 13.

References in classic literature ?
The natural strength of such literature will, of course, be in the line of its tendencies; in transparency, variety, and directness. To the unembarrassing matter, the unembarrassed style!
Casaubon, and become wise and strong in his strength and wisdom, than to conceive with that distinctness which is no longer reflection but feeling-- an idea wrought back to the directness of sense, like the solidity of objects--that he had an equivalent centre of self, whence the lights and shadows must always fall with a certain difference.
But I used then and for long afterwards to tax him with obscurity, not knowing that my own want of simplicity and directness was to blame for that effect.
Agnes did not reply with her customary directness. Trifling as it was, the reference to Montbarry, proceeding from that woman of all others, confused and agitated her.
He betrayed the inaccuracies of the self-read man, and, it must be granted, the sureness and directness of the primitive mind.
Lucille felt suddenly helpless before the directness of his gaze, his storm of questions.
With her customary energy and directness she spoke at once, and spoke first.
The directness of this appeal drew the eyes of the whole crowd upon the Reverend Mr.
"What I told him last evening was this: that I admired you more than any woman I had ever seen, and that I should like immensely to make you my wife." He uttered these words with great directness and firmness, and without any sense of confusion.
What is it but, with absolute directness, a question of interest or, as people say, of the story?
She offered him the comforting directness which she might have given Bill.
Although there were gasps from both sides at the House - not necessarily in appreciation of his directness - his words were less than startling.

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