discontinue

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discontinue

to terminate or abandon an action.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the access to and composition of available methods were associated with a reduction in the relevant discontinuation rate.
CONCLUSIONS: High contraceptive discontinuation in the past has contributed tens of millions of cases of unmet need, and discontinuation among current users will contribute even more cases in the future.
A 1989 simulation analysis illustrated the importance of high contraceptive discontinuation to contraceptive prevalence.
After 1 year, discontinuation rates for AEs were numerically higher with INF than ETN (18.7% versus 12.6%) although discontinuation rates for inefficacy were similar (19.8% versus 18%) [9,10,16].
This may partly explain differences in rates of discontinuation, with fewer patients in the SCQM cohort stopping therapy as compared to those in the RABBIT register.
Data obtained from this systematic review suggested a gradual increase in drug discontinuation over time with all TNF inhibitors mainly as a result of adverse events (AE's) and inefficacy.
This study found that a large proportion of discontinuations preceding pregnancies were due to contraceptive failures.
Association between contraceptive discontinuation and pregnancy intentions in Guatemala
To determine whether contraceptive discontinuation is associated with pregnancies that are conceived earlier than desired (mistimed) or are not wanted at the time of conception (unwanted).
This distinction was less important here than it often is, because we focused on women who subsequently became pregnant and were consequently exposed to the risk of pregnancy at some point following discontinuation.
CONTEXT: Contraceptive discontinuation is a common event that may be associated with low motivation to avoid pregnancy.
Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the characteristics of women who reported births as intended when they followed contraceptive failure or discontinuation for reasons other than a desire for pregnancy.