discount

(redirected from discounters)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.

discount

n. the payment of less than the full amount due on a promissory note or price for goods or services. Usually a discount is by agreement, and includes the common situation in which a holder of a long-term promissory note or material goods will sell it/them for less than face value in order to get cash now---the difference is the discount.

discount

noun abatement, allowance, amount deeucted, bargain, decessio, decrease, decrement, deductio, deduction, diminution, lower price, markdown, reduction, special price, subtraction
Associated concepts: discount a loan, discount bills, discount notes, trade discount

discount

(Disbelieve), verb be indifferent to, belittle, brush aside, decessio, deductio, depreciate, discredit, disdain, disesteem, disparage, disregard, distrust, doubt, gloss over, harbor suspicions, ignore, make light of, misprize, mistrust, pass over, pay no attention, pay no heed, pay no mind, question, slight, spurn, suspect

discount

(Minimize), verb abate, abbreviate, abridge, allay, attenuate, condense, curtail, deflate, detract, diminish, lessen, minimalize, pare, reduce, render less, scale down, shorten, underestimate, understate, undervalue

discount

(Reduce), verb abate, allow a margin, cut, decrease, deduct from, depreciate, detract, lower, lower the sale price, make allowance for, mark down, rebate, reeuce the mark-up, sell below par, slash prices, strike off, subduct, subtract, take from, take off, underprice, undersell, undervalue
See also: brokerage, deduct, deduction, depreciate, diminution, discredit, disparage, drawback, except, exclude, lessen, minimize, rebate, reduce, refund, reject

DISCOUNT, practice. A set off, or defalcation in an action. Vin. Ab. h.t. DISCOUNT, contracts. An allowance made upon prompt payment in the purchase of goods; it is also the interest allowed in advancing money upon bills of exchange, or other negotiable securities due at a future time And to discount, signifies the act of buying a bill of exchange, or promissory note for a less sum than that which upon its face, is payable.
     2. Among merchants, the term used when a bill of exchange is transferred, is, that the bill is sold, and not that it is discounted. See Poth. De l'Usure, n. 128 3 Pet. R. 40.

References in periodicals archive ?
"We are now seeing the emergence of second-generation discounter stores," says Steve Gotham, the report's author.
And while we're not satisfied with our front-end sales growth, our overall front-end market share growth against grocers, discounters and other drug stores has rarely looked better."
Aldi Local is a subbrand to differentiate the discounter's smaller city stores from its full-sized ones.
To fight back against the hard discounters, French grocers realized they would have to improve their use of private-label products.
'It has seen some success in some developing regions of Latin America; however, it is struggling against discounters in the United Kingdom, and Spain, Peru, where traditional trade still dominates, and in South Korea where e-commerce is fast becoming the dominant channel.'
But McKevitt said: "Discounter momentum is starting to slow."
In contrast, the average transaction value increased 3% - or PS1 - for discounters, up to PS24 this year.
"Price matching may have the effect of highlighting to shoppers just how much cheaper the discounters are.
IGD chief executive Joanne Denney-Finch said: "Half of shoppers told us they used food discounters in the last month to buy some of their food and groceries, up from 37 per cent in 2011."
* 26 percent of shoppers plan to use food discounters more in the coming year
Store openings were at a record high: 286 in December (223 discounters, 50 cosmetics and 13 hypermarkets).
Meanwhile, discounters also increased their share in grocery retailing across European markets.