distinctiveness


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Without a coherent vision, institutions have a tendency to drift, in many cases losing the distinctiveness that will allow them to thrive.
On the question of whether a mark has in fact acquired distinctiveness, the applicant bears the ultimate burden of persuasion.
Distinctiveness refers to "features that allow a situation to stand out in the environment" (Bowen & Ostroff, 2004, p.
I would argue that we are all better served by a recruiting process that emphasizes the distinctiveness of the learning experience in honors and that we should spend most of our time educating families about the way honors classes are different rather than better.
However, its ruling left little doubt that it regarded these marks as generic in relation to the relevant goods and services and lacking distinctiveness.
We need to understand what our economic assets are and preserve our distinctiveness. Whatever we develop and build it has to be authentic and rooted in our history and communal memory," remarked Sayyid Faisal.
Applying this reasoning, J.Lemieux concluded from the evidence that the Jaymei Mark was distinctive on the basis that it had acquired local distinctiveness in the Vancouver area.
You may still "suffer" a bit of that distinctiveness on the way to the Great Western Society's locomotive collection at the Didcot Railway Centre in Oxfordshire.
"He was very clear that his job was not to pull together the distinctive areas into an amorphous mush but to make the case for their distinctiveness."
RADIO Wales and Cymru will be subject of a review of how well some radio services perform in terms of their quality, distinctiveness and value for money.
The work is a compilation of Jewish-Christian-Muslim reflection centered on the question of the distinctiveness and role of "Humanity" in creation.
But after Powers filed 200 pages of evidence supporting the name's distinctiveness, the PTO approved his application.