doctrinal

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As Powell points out, while intellectually committing himself to a doctrinally rigid and a historical concept of Islam as false, unchanging and socially damaging, William Muir did not believe in the automatic disloyalty of Indian Muslims to British rule, instead using his official position to rescue the careers of many Muslim elites, including those be continued to disagree with.
Pope Francis has established a much more informal, man-of-the-people style in comparison with his predecessor, although the book shows that the new Pope is as doctrinally conservative as Benedict XVI, the report added.
But there was little or no suggestion that Francis would be any less doctrinally conservative than his predecessors on issues such as artificial contraception, priestly celibacy, female ordination or homosexuality.
Both historically and doctrinally, it would be a big mistake to treat the Sunnis as one bloc and the Shi'ites as one bloc," he argued.
a claim of lack of consent, doctrinally, sounds in battery, and a batten requires proof.
It is perhaps one of the most astonishing paradoxes of the early church that at the point that it was at its most doctrinally pure it was also most effective practically.
Another valid critical perspective on Dillard's nonfiction would plausibly underscore its religious character as more interrogative than assertive, more often meditative than doctrinally expository.
Students in doctrinally similar Salafi schools located in other governorates have begun discussing what to do to stop the Houthis blockade and prevent their military expansion, according to a Salafi student in Damaj.
If any authorization did come in for neighboring areas, the LRSU is doctrinally allowed 100 kilometers into "enemy" or in this case nonpermissive territory.
Judaism and Islam are closer to each other both doctrinally and in their approach to dispute resolution than either is to Christianity," Chas W.
Following a string of mordant themes, Nanni Moretti turns to gentle comedic stylings with the artistically and doctrinally conservative "We Have a Pope.
Even where the work under discussion seems impressively philosophical--as in the case of the epistemological reflections of Hugo Cavellus (Hugh MacCaghwell)--it gives the impression of being doctrinally philosophical, as if fearful of departing from the thought of Aristotle, as mediated through Duns Scotus.