Draft

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Related to dodge the draft: Draft evasion

Draft

A written order by the first party, called the drawer, instructing a second party, called the drawee (such as a bank), to pay money to a third party, called the payee. An order to pay a sum certain in money, signed by a drawer, payable on demand or at a definite time, to order or bearer.

A tentative, provisional, or preparatory writing out of any document (as a will, contract, lease, and so on) for purposes of discussion and correction, which is afterward to be prepared in its final form.

Compulsory Conscription of persons into military service.

Also, a small arbitrary deduction or allowance made to a merchant or importer, in the case of goods sold by weight or taxable by weight, to cover possible loss of weight in handling or from differences in scales.

A draft that is payable on demand is called a sight draft because the drawee must comply with its terms of payment when it is presented, in his or her sight or presence, by the payee. In contrast, a time draft is one that is payable only on the date specified on its face or thereafter.

A draft may be payable to a designated payee or to the bearer—the person who has possession of the draft at the time it is presented to the drawee for payment—pursuant to the drawer's directions.

A draft is sometimes synonymous with a bill of exchange, Commercial Paper, or negotiable instrument.

draft

1) n. a bill of exchange or check in which one party (including a bank) is directed by the party drafting (writing) the bill or check to take money from the drafter's (writer's) bank account and pay it to another person or entity. 2) v. to prepare and sign a bill of exchange or check. 3) n. a less than final document, which is ready for discussion, re-writing and/or editing, such as a book, a proposal, or a legislative bill. 4) n. compulsory enrollment of non-volunteers for military service by lottery, as existed under the Selective Service System during World War I, from 1940 as World War II threatened to involve the United States, through the Korean and Vietnam conflicts until 1973. Since 1980 all men are required to register at 18, but there is no draft or call-ups. (See; bill of exchange, check)

References in periodicals archive ?
As for Douglas's alleged use of the SATC to dodge the draft, Murphy's suggestions are based on the one quotation from Mendenhall, which, if you look at it closely, does not refer specifically to Douglas's motivation.
As his fellow countrymen fought and died in the paddy fields of South-East Asia, Bush jumped a waiting list of 100,000 to dodge the draft.
He also says there was still a lot of shame in the US because many of its own citizens had gone to great lengths to dodge the draft into the Army whereas he had enlisted and ``was proud to do so''.