domestic partners


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Related to domestic partners: Domestic partnership

domestic partners

n. unmarried couples, including homosexuals, living together in long-standing relationships, who may be entitled to some of the same benefits as married people, such as job-related health plans.

References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, it is important that domestic partners design their estate planning in order to allow each other to manage assets in the event of incapacity and to benefit each other during life and after death.
* More than 8,250 employers provided domestic partner benefits in 2004, a 13 percent increase over 2003;
For myself, I cannot imagine my mother sobbing with joy and relief as she says, "Thank goodness, Jon has finally found a domestic partner."
Employers thus may consider extending employee benefits to same-sex domestic partners without fear of disqualifying the entire plan.
Because of the ABCNY's policy, domestic partners of employees are eligible to receive family rates for medical insurance and to receive the same treatment as spouses when they are the beneficiaries of term life insurance coverage.
Thompson Publishing Group (Washington, D.C.) has released Domestic Partner Benefits-An Employer's Guide, a softbound volume designed to help plan sponsors investigate the advantages and disadvantages of offering pension and welfare benefits to employees' domestic partners.
BUCKING RECENT CORPORATE TRENDS to extend employee benefits to same-sex domestic partners, in December the newly merged Exxon Mobil Corporation revoked a Mobil policy which provided health coverage to same-sex partners of newly hired employees.
Bevilacqua's action was apparently sparked by the Philadelphia City Council's decision last year to pass "domestic partners" legislation giving spousal benefits to the partners of gay city employees -- a measure the cardinal strongly opposes.
Perhaps this situation does not cause too much practical difficulty in reporting to various types of domestic partners. However, there are an ever-increasing number of foreign partners in partnerships (either domestic or foreign) and Schedule K-1 of Form 1065, U.S.
Today, thirteen percent of all United States employers offer benefits to the domestic partners of their employees.(1) Larger companies, those with more than 5,000 employees, the figure is twenty-five percent.(2) Benefits offered to domestic partners often include both hard and soft benefits.(3) Hard benefits, which are commonly called "cost intensive benefits," may include medical, vision, and dental insurance along with pension or retirement benefits.(4) Other benefits are referred to as soft benefits and may include bereavement leave, legal services, employee discounts, health and fitness programs, relocation policies, and child care.(5)
Many universities offer domestic partner benefits, which include insurance and any other benefits available to married spouses that are also extended to same-sex domestic partners.
According to Eason, some groups say employers that previously offered benefits to domestic partners, in trying to be fair to all their employees, may now reconsider doing so.

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