domestic

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Domestic

Pertaining to the house or home. A person employed by a household to perform various servient duties. Any household servant, such as a maid or butler. Relating to a place of birth, origin, or domicile.

That which is domestic is related to household uses. A domestic animal is one that is sufficiently tame to live with a family, such as a dog or cat, or one that can be used to contribute to a family's support, such as a cow, chicken, or horse. When something is domesticated, it is converted to domestic use, as in the case of a wild animal that is tamed.

Domestic relations are relationships between various family members, such as a Husband and Wife, that are regulated by Family Law.

A domestic corporation of a particular state is one that has been organized and chartered in that state as opposed to a foreign corporation, which has been incorporated in another state or territory. In tax law, a domestic corporation is one that has originated in any U.S. state or territory.

Domestic products are goods that are manufactured within a particular territory rather than imported from outside that territory.

domestic

(Household), adjective belonging to the house, domiciliary, family, home, homemaking, household, housekeeping, internal, pertaining to one's household, perraining to the family, pertaining to the home, relating to the family, relating to the home
Associated concepts: domestic animals, domestic duties, domestic employment, domestic fixtures, domestic purroses, domestic relations, domestic servants, domestic service, domestic status, domestic use

domestic

(Indigenous), adjective endemic, home, homemade, local, national, native, native grown, not forrign, not imported
Associated concepts: domestic commerce, domestic corpooation, domestic judgment
See also: internal, local, national, native, residential

domestic

slang expression for an incident of violence in the home between a man and a woman.
References in periodicals archive ?
The TFP promises a (re)domestication of the troubled family by actively producing heteronormative domesticity where it is found to be 'absent'--such as through the 'practical' labour of feeding, clothing and routinising children.
In addition to fatherhood and domesticity, Puerto Rican rural families had other frames of reference that led men to migrate.
In Hitler at Home, Stratigakos chronicles the inception and implementation of Adolf Hitler's domesticity through his private architecture and pictorial representations, but she does so with a critical eye turned toward the larger implications of how this domesticity served the needs of Nazi propaganda and the Third Reich.
The production of My Domesticity is currently based in San Carlos City.
Politicizing Domesticity shows the iconography of domesticity as a "powerful and contested tool of gendered propaganda" (165).
The weaknesses of the last few chapters aside, Medieval Domesticity provides a worthwhile contribution to the history of the medieval family.
Not surprisingly, the Third Reich defined German domesticity as Aryan and, above all, not Jewish or Polish.
The German colonies in Southwest Africa feature particularly prominently, as commentators often used norms of domesticity to distinguish Germanness from Africanness.
The tale of Miss Sally Chauncey, "the last survivor of one of the most aristocratic old colonial families" of the village of East Parish (126), serves as a textual warning of the dangers of a limited and stable domesticity.
While Jameson denounced domesticity, other writers 'articulated a kind of epistemology of the home in which their heroines interpret being in the world through domestic ritual and the language of the everyday' (p.
For anyone who has read Gustav Freytag's ponderous Realist novel, Soll und Haben (1855), it will come as no shock that in the imaginative world of the 19th century, the concept of domesticity was directly linked to issues of bourgeois respectability, the desirability and moral imperative of German colonialism, and the efficient functioning of the nation both as a political and as an economic entity.
This conflict over family life and domesticity demonstrated the agency of freedwomen when interacting with northern reformers.