domicile

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domicile

n. the place where a person has his/her permanent principal home to which he/she returns or intends to return. This becomes significant in determining in what state a probate of a dead person's estate is filed, what state can assess income or inheritance taxes, where a party can begin divorce proceedings, or whether there is "diversity of citizenship" between two parties which may give federal courts jurisdiction over a lawsuit. Where a person has several "residences" it may be a matter of proof as to which is the state of domicile. A business has its domicile in the state where its headquarters is located.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

domicile

the country that a person treats as his permanent home and to which he has the closest legal attachment. A person cannot be without a domicile and cannot have more than one domicile at any one time; he acquires a domicile of origin at birth (normally, if his father is alive, his father's; if his father is not alive, his mother's). He retains this domicile until he acquires a domicile of choice (by making a home in a country with the intention that it should be a permanent base). Domicile is distinct from nationality; it is also distinct from ‘ordinary residence’ in that the latter may be acquired without any intention to reside there permanently.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Practitioners who are interested in providing a domiciliary service can avail themselves of recent guidance provided by the Optical Confederation's Domiciliary Eyecare Committee 'Providing domiciliary eyecare services--Guidance for the profession' which is available on the Optical Confederation's website.
A Welsh Government spokesman said: "Domiciliary support is at the very heart of the system, and domiciliary care workers play a vital role in supporting people to maintain their independence and live at home."
But it does not prohibit a non-domiciliary state regulator from continuing to obtain a copy of financial statements reinsurers' file with their domiciliary state regulators.
Care Quality Commission (CQC) chief executive Cynthia Bower said: "Home care is one of the most difficult areas of care to monitor because it is delivered behind closed doors which is why, starting next month, CQC will be carrying out a themed inspection programme of 250 providers of domiciliary care services.
Karen Firth, managing director of A Caring Hand of Support, denies that the company has been providing domiciliary care.
The extra care and domiciliary care services will dovetail with the range of residential and nursing care provided by the Wrexham-based company, backed up by the organisation's in-house Teaching Care Centre.
Although well developed programs of postnatal support are available in some parts of the world such as the Netherlands and the U.K., the provision of home based postnatal care in Australia has generally relied heavily on the informal care provided by family and friends with varying degrees of professional oversight and care from domiciliary midwives (AIHW 2003; Cooke and Barclay 1999).
Pay roll expenditure represents around 60 per cent of care home, and 80 per cent of domiciliary care fees.
Surecare was established in 1994 and is a franchise operation currently comprising 27 domiciliary care businesses located throughout England.
The VA domiciliary in Fort Thomas, Ky., received a $10,000 DAV Charitable Service Trust grant to provide financial support for homeless veterans.
"You're resting so much power in the hands of the domiciliary state," said Kevin Hennosy of Spread the Risk Inc., a consumer group.