dragnet

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dragnet

any system of coordinated efforts by police forces to track down wanted persons.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Head of the fishermen's association, Christodoulos Charalambous, said the government's decision to allow dragnets could be catastrophic for the industry.
He said the president had given him assurances that any illegalities noticed in the use of dragnets would result in licences being revoked.
He said he believes the profession stands no chance of survival if dragnets are brought in and 500 families will be adversely affected by the government's decision.
She also examines the ways in which reformers sought to control the symbolic terrain through which citizens encountered the police, such as the use of radio programs to both publicize the use of dragnets to apprehend criminals and make that activity popular with citizens.
The analytical extremism of courts and commentators is understandable, since dragnets are important components of modern-day law enforcement at the same time that they pose serious threats to liberty and social stability.
Camara authorized and Davis contemplated dragnets, but only if they (1) are subject to judicial authorization when nonconsensual, (2) are effective means of averting a significant danger or solving a crime that cannot be averted or solved through development of individualized suspicion, and (3) do not involve the types of intrusions associated with physical searches for evidence of crime or interrogations.
The group search and seizures that most frequently confront the courts-business inspections, roadblocks, and drug testing--do not come close to exhausting the types of dragnets that the government currently pursues.
(10) While the United States is behind Europe in its use of DNA dragnets, it has employed them on a smaller scale.
Proponents of properly conducted DNA dragnets make comparisons to drunk driving roadblocks and the widespread fingerprinting of all people present at or near a crime scene; they claim that when samples are freely provided, there is no Fourth Amendment violation.
(18) Ironically, suspect databanks created through dragnets may provide less protection for those who voluntarily provide genetic material than for those who are actually indicted but then acquitted, since in many states the law requires the destruction of DNA evidence once a person is exonerated but leaves dragnet databases completely unregulated.