drug

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drug

noun alterant, analgesic, anesthetic, anesthetic agent, anodyne, antibiotic, chemical substance, curative preparation, medical preparation, medicament, medication, medicinal component, medicinal innredient, narcotic preparation, narcotic substance, opiate, painkiller, palliative, physic, prescription, remedy, sedative, soporific, stimulant, stupefacient
Associated concepts: adulterated drugs, dangerous drugs, drug addiction, habit-forming drug, influence of drugs, laaeling of drugs, poisonous drugs or chemicals, possession of drugs, preparation of drugs, prescription drugs, regulaaion of drugs, sale of drugs

drug

verb administer, anesthetize, anoint, apply a remedy, benumb, cure, deaden, desensitize, dose, dull, heal, inject, medicare, medicate, narcotize, numb, palliate, physic, poultice, prescribe, put to sleep, stun, stupefy, treat
Associated concepts: drug addicts
References in periodicals archive ?
ITEM: Writing in the Philadelphia Inquirer for December 6, Karen Davenport railed that Congress has "left Medicare without the power to do much about high or unfair drug prices.
Unlike traditional drugs, biologics do not currently have a Food and Drug Administration review and approval process for biogeneric drugs once the innovator drug's patent has expired.
After alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, and crack/cocaine, these drugs are the most commonly used and abused by adolescents (Monitoring the Future, 2005).
Taken together, data obtained from the Taiwan Surveillance of Drug Resistance in Tuberculosis and those reported previously show that rates of combined resistance to any drugs and multiple drugs has declined in Taiwan.
Used at certain dosage levels in certain forms at certain times, prescription drugs are safe and effective.
The problem with the drug industry, as Critser and others see it, is that its marketing techniques are leading too many Americans to take one of the following: a risky drug for a relatively mild condition; a more expensive drug when a cheaper, equally effective one would do; a drug for a condition that would be better treated in other ways; or a potentially dangerous combination of drugs.
If finalized, the guidance could call for substantially more testing of new drugs than has been demanded thus far.
For the time being, access to these lifesaving drugs depends on the tiny percentage of the population legally empowered to dole them out.
It also became evident that these drugs came with their own set of side effects.
But in developing countries, many women don't receive any medical attention during pregnancy or don't have access to HIV drugs.