dry law


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dry law

(US) a law prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shortly after the trial, a state constable in Iron County contacted federal Prohibition officials and convinced them that the Scalcuccis had violated the dry law. A federal Prohibition agent named Leo Grove then led constables in another raid at the Scalcuccis' store, where they found 11 barrels of wine.
United States (223) case reached the issue of whether the Volstead Act repealed the Bone Dry law. The Volstead Act actually had an explicit repealer clause, (224) to the extent of inconsistencies with prior laws.
"The discontent with the dry law has been growing during the past few years, especially in regions of the country where the principal activity is foreign tourism," said the text of the Senate legislation.
The Times quoted various papers that opposed the dry laws. Quoting the New York World, the Times reported that "after 12 o'clock tonight, the Government of the United States ...
Reports from the mine record hundreds of workers dismissed or suspended every month for abandoning work, failing to fulfill the required production levels, laziness, fudging their production figures, insolence, violating the camps' dry law, missing entire workdays, immorality, and dishonesty.
While Sebso, the fictional Jewish FBI agent, is depicted in the series as half-hearted, inept, and ultimately corruptible, Davis' study brings back to life the amazing career of the colorful, and incredibly successful, Jewish enforcer of the dry laws, agent Izzy Einstein, whose astonishing record4,932 arrests in five years, with a 95 percent conviction ratemade him by far the most prolific agent of the Prohibition era.
Politicians knew that they could placate their tormentors by supporting dry laws, but they also knew they could placate drinkers by failing to enforce them"
Half-drunken legislators enact dry laws and celebrate the achievement in moonshine.
Owners of some of these establishments, including Texas Guinan and Helen Morgan, became major celebrities, and their flouting of the dry laws enraged reformers while reinforcing a growing public perception of the Volstead Act as unenforceable.
It became one of the few places to obtain a drink on Sundays during the years of the Dry Laws in North Wales, and was therefore very popular!
In a follow-up article, "Annual Report of the Managing Director", we read, "(We) strenuously object to that part of the report of the Committee of Five dealing with the Wright Acts" (I cannot remember what this act was about, except I think it was about prohibition enforcement in California) and "this committee should not be engaged in political embroilments relative to our dry laws".
Candidates for sheriff often announced their position on prohibition laws prior to an election, permitting those counties that wanted easy access to liquor to elect a sheriff who would not enforce the dry laws (Newsweek, 1959).