Due

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Due

Just; proper; regular; lawful; sufficient; reasonable, as in the phrases due care, due process of law, due notice.

Owing; payable; justly owed. That which one contracts to pay or perform to another; that which law or justice requires to be paid or done. Owed, or owing, as distinguished from payable. A debt is often said to be due from a person where he or she is the party owing it, or primarily bound to pay, whether the time for payment has or has not arrived. The same thing is true of the phrase due and owing.

The term due is essentially contextual in nature and has various legal applications, all of which involve the sufficiency or reasonableness of an action or obligation.

Due care is the use of the requisite amount of caution needed in a particular set of circumstances based upon what a reasonably prudent person would do under similar circumstances. Exercising due care while driving might mean obeying traffic regulations.

Due consideration is the proper weight or significance given to a matter or a factor as circumstances mandate. It may also have application in sufficiency of consideration in the law of contracts.

due

n. and adj. owed as of a specific date. A popular legal redundancy is that a debt is "due, owing and unpaid." Unpaid does not necessarily mean that a debt is due.

DUE. What ought to be paid; what may be demanded. It differs from owing in this, that, sometimes, what is owing is not due; a note, payable thirty days after date, is owing immediately after it is delivered to the payee, but it is not due until the thirty days have elapsed.
     2. Bills of exchange, and promissory notes, are not, due until the end of the three days of grace, (q.v.) unless the last of these days happen to fall on a Sunday, or other holy day, when it becomes due on the Saturday before, and not on the Monday following. Story, P. N. Sec. 440; 1 Bell's Com. 410 Story on Bills, Sec. 283; 2 Hill, N. Y. R. 587; 2 Applet. R. 264.
     3. Due also signifies just or proper; as, a due presentment, and demand of payraent, must be made. See 4 Rawle, 307; 3 Leigh, 389; 3 Cranch, 300.

References in classic literature ?
Whilst a few representatives, therefore, from each State, may bring with them a due knowledge of their own State, every representative will have much information to acquire concerning all the other States.
Allowing to this case the weight which is due to it, and comparing it with that of the House of Representatives as above explained it seems to give the fullest assurance, that a representative for every THIRTY THOUSAND INHABITANTS will render the latter both a safe and competent guardian of the interests which will be confided to it.
The changes in appearances of an object which are due to changes in the intervening medium will not affect, or will affect only very slightly, the appearances from places close to the object.
An impression due to this sort of intervening medium is called a perception, and is interesting to psychology on its own account, not merely as one of the set of correlated particulars which is the physical object of which (as we say) we are having a perception.
de Boville, the inspector of prisons, to whom they are due. You acknowledge, of course, that you owe this sum to him?"
"Your bills, at least, are the first that will fall due."
And what due or proper thing is given by cookery, and to what?
I guess that squared up all balances due on Petacha."
When all or nearly all the individuals exposed to certain conditions are affected in the same way, the change at first appears to be directly due to such conditions; but in some cases it can be shown that quite opposite conditions produce similar changes of structure.
It is easy to perceive that this will tend to destroy, in the common apprehension, all distinction between the sources from which they might proceed; and will give the federal government the same advantage for securing a due obedience to its authority which is enjoyed by the government of each State, in addition to the influence on public opinion which will result from the important consideration of its having power to call to its assistance and support the resources of the whole Union.
Passepartout, who had conscientiously studied the programme of his duties, was more than surprised to see his master guilty of the inexactness of appearing at this unaccustomed hour; for, according to rule, he was not due in Saville Row until precisely midnight.
But if the failure is due to a wrong choice if he has represented a horse as throwing out both his off legs at once, or introduced technical inaccuracies in medicine, for example, or in any other art the error is not essential to the poetry.