dynasty

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DYNASTY. A succession of kings in the same line or family; government; sovereignty.

References in periodicals archive ?
The emergence of two major, though dynastically oriented, political parties - the PPP and the PML - on a national level which have alternated ruling Pakistan since 1988, besides strong sub-national parties within the constituent units (as in Belgium and Switzerland) - parties such as the MQM, ANP, JUI, BNP, JWP and other Baloch parties.
As Thai citizens become increasingly involved in their country's political processes, the very presence of a dynastically appointed king -- he still retains ultimate power -- begins to look more and more anachronistic.
National and regional parties: The emergence of two major, though dynastically oriented, political parties - the PPP and the PML - on a national level which have alternated ruling Pakistan since 1988, besides strong sub-national parties within the constituent units (as in Belgium and Switzerland) - parties such as the MQM, ANP, JUI, BNP, JWP and other Baloch parties.
underpins the plot of La Muse du departement, where the impotence of the puny but dynastically ambitious Polydore de La Baudraye is disclosed by Milaud, his commoner cousin from Nevers, to M.
Dynastically, it contains five recognized regimes (Maliki Government in Iraq, Netanyahu Government in Israel, Hashemite Monarchy in Jordan, Sulayman/Hariri Government in Lebanon, Asad dictatorship in Syria) and five active challengers (Kurdish Regional Government in Iraq, Hizballah in Lebanon, Fatah organization in the West Bank, Hamas organization in the Gaza Strip, and the Syrian National Council - based in Turkey).
For Lennox Berkeley was the scion of a powerful, if dynastically split, aristocratic family.
bar]nid house with his own family, slowly incorporating, as it were, its dynastically legitimized royal status, and thus gradually outmaneuvering his peers.
In many ways, then, James represented a return to a pattern of early-modern political power that was properly masculine and dynastically stable.
They resonate with Saint-Pathus' Vie et miracles de Saint Louis, interweaving history and hagiography, and through patronage and bequest, associate Charles dynastically with the last Capetians through visual references to Jeanne d'Evreux's book of hours.
The artistic quality, accessibility, and poor state of preservation of several of these later works, as well as the general absence of contemporary scholarly interest in both the subjects and artists, may explain the lack of consideration given these dynastically significant portraits.