eavesdrop


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

eavesdrop

verb hearken, intercept, listen, listen stealthily, overhear, tap the lines, wiretap
Associated concepts: eavesdropping device, search warrant, suppression hearing, wiretapping
See also: monitor, overhear, spy
References in periodicals archive ?
To achieve the insidious practice of tapping into secure data, wireless pirates need only to dial into the wireless network and then intercept or eavesdrop on backbone activity on a traditional Internet network of servers and desktops.
Janik used three hydrophones (underwater microphones) to eavesdrop on dolphins swimming in the Moray Firth off the northeast coast of Scotland.
Instead of overwhelming us with the usual group-show cacophony, Sommerman simply let us eavesdrop on an intriguing three-way conversation.
Is it possible that the suspects had used computers to surreptitiously eavesdrop on the officers during the execution of the warrant?
We have a mass of subjects of operational and investigative activities, who may eavesdrop lawfully.
On December 17 of last year, during his weekly radio address, President Bush confirmed reports by the New York Times and CNN that, following the 9/11 attacks, he had given the National Security Agency (NSA) authorization to eavesdrop on Americans communicating with people overseas.
The gist of the Justice Department's argument, which Gonzales kept repeating, is that the President's "inherent constitutional authority as commander in chief" and the Congressional Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) right after 9/11 give him all the power he needs to eavesdrop in the United States without a warrant.
11, 2001, President Bush authorized the NSA to eavesdrop on Americans suspected of ties to Al Qaeda without first obtaining warrants.
Law already exists granting the president great latitude in using the super-secret National Security Agency to eavesdrop on U.S.
A well-known privacy expert noted that there are many other, easier ways for someone to eavesdrop on people.
"We believe that using city employees to eavesdrop on conversations between reporters and elected officials has a chilling effect on the amount of information made available to the public on critical policy issues," The Associated Press quoted ACLU spokesman Edwin C.