ecoterrorist

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ecoterrorist

a person who uses violence in order to achieve environmentalist aims.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hereinafter: Department of Homeland Security, Ecoterrorism.
See Rutmanis, supra note 179 (arguing low-level punishments for ecoterrorism ineffective).
Wide-ranging entries include the Animal Liberation Front, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, the Central Intelligence Agency, ecoterrorism, gender-based terrorism, whether insurance covers terrorism, Osama bin Laden (including his death), and terrorism in popular culture.
The Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security agree that ecoterrorism is a severe problem, naming the [most] serious domestic terrorist threat in the United States today as the Earth Liberation Front (ELF) and the Animal Liberation Front (ALF) which, by all accounts, is a converging movement with similar ideologies [and] common personnel .
26) Even Daniel Simberloff concedes, however, that "the attacks of 9/11 have surely increased public concern about foreign immigrants and visitors [and] the potential link of introduced species to ecoterrorism and bioterrorism.
What has been described as ecoterrorism or ecotage, for example, includes acts that are sometimes committed by environmental activists involved in specific campaigns (e.
The FBI considers ecoterrorism the number one domestic terrorism threat in the US, on a par with Al Qaeda, and the destruction of property alone can now bring with it charges of terrorism.
crowded area terrorism (crowded Globe ecoterrorism, actually) (10 4)
Of more than a dozen environmental and animal-rights activists arrested following a nine-year investigation into ecoterrorism in the Northwest, only Waters, 32, has declined to plead guilty.
The CDFE Web site proudly cites an award Arnold received for his "8-part series The Environmental Battle," and notes his "1983 investigative report for Reason magazine on EcoTerrorism remains the classic in the field" (CDFE, 2007).
For example, in Illinois, lawmakers defined endangering the food or water supply as acts of terrorism, while a Pennsylvania law makes tampering with or destroying crops a crime of ecoterrorism.