Put

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Put

An option—a right that operates as a continuing proposal—given in exchange for consideration—something of value—permitting its holder to sell a particular stock or commodity at a fixed price for a stated quantity and within a limited time period.

A put is purchased for a fee paid to the person who agrees to accept the stock or goods if they are offered. The purchaser of this right to sell expects the price of the stock or commodity to decrease so that he can deliver the stock or commodity at a profit. If the price rises, the option need not be exercised. The reverse transaction is a call.

TO PUT, pleading. To select, to demand; as, the said C D puts himself upon the country; that is, he selects the trial by jury, as the mode of settling the matter in dispute, and does not rely upon an issue in law. Gould, Pl. c. 6. part 1, Sec. 19.

References in classic literature ?
And Jerry did, uncovering two eggs, breaking them and lapping that portion of their precious contents which was not spilled and wasted in the sand.
The vaults which hid the eggs until they were ready for the incubator were located many miles south of the incubator, and would be visited yearly by the council of twenty chieftains.
"No, indeed; I never care to hatch eggs unless I've a nice snug nest, in some quiet place, with a baker's dozen of eggs under me.
"Why do you lay eggs, when you don't expect to hatch them?"
Nagaina spun clear round, forgetting everything for the sake of the one egg. Rikki-tikki saw Teddy's father shoot out a big hand, catch Teddy by the shoulder, and drag him across the little table with the tea-cups, safe and out of reach of Nagaina.
Nagaina saw that she had lost her chance of killing Teddy, and the egg lay between Rikki-tikki's paws.
JEMIMA PUDDLE-DUCK came every afternoon; she laid nine eggs in the nest.
At last Jemima told him that she intended to begin to sit next day--"and I will bring a bag of corn with me, so that I need never leave my nest until the eggs are hatched.
There were two large white eggs, and Peter lifted them up and reflected.
Peter put the eggs into this hat and set it on the lagoon.
He answered by saying, " Why, there are none others in these southern countries." He informed me that the number of eggs in the nest of the petise is considerably less than in that of the other kind, namely, not more than fifteen on an average, but he asserted that more than one female deposited them.
The only difference between organisms which annually produce eggs or seeds by the thousand, and those which produce extremely few, is, that the slow-breeders would require a few more years to people, under favourable conditions, a whole district, let it be ever so large.