identity

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Related to ego identity: Identity diffusion

identity

(Individuality), noun being, characteristic, difference, dissimilarity, distinction, distinctive feature, distinctness, distinguishing characteristic, distinnuishing quality, idiosyncrasy, individualism, mannerism, oneness, originality, particularity, peculiarity, perceivable dissimilarity, personal characteristic, personality, quality of being singular, self, selfhood, selfness, singularity, speciality, specialty, specific quality, specificity, uniqueness, unlikeness
Associated concepts: duty to ascertain identity, proof of identity
Foreign phrases: Nihil facit error nominis cum de corpore constat.An error in the name is of no consequence when there is certainty as to the person. Ex multitudine signooum, colligitur identitas vera. The true identity of a thing is shown from a number of signs. Nomina sunt mutabilia, res autem immobiles. Names are mutable, but things are immutable.

identity

(Similarity), noun agreement, alikeness, coequality, comparability, conformability, consimilarity, consimilitude, consimility, duplication, equality, equipollence, equipollency, equivalence, homogeneity, identicalness, likeness, match, oneness, parallelism, parity, resemblance, sameness, semblance, similarity, similitude, synonymity, uniformity, unity
See also: par, personality, resemblance, semblance

IDENTITY, evidence. Sameness.
     2. It is frequently necessary to identify persons and things. In criminal prosecutions, and in actions for torts and on contracts, it is required to be proved that the defendants have in criminal actions, and for injuries, been guilty of the crime or injury charged; and in an action on a contract, that the defendant was a party to it. Sometimes, too, a party who has been absent, and who appears to claim an inheritance, must prove his identity and, not unfrequently, the body of a person which has been found dead must be identified: cases occur when the body is much disfigured, and, at other times, there is nothing left but the skeleton. Cases of considerable difficulty arise, in consequence of the omission to take particular notice; 2 Stark. Car. 239 Ryan's Med. Jur. 301; and in consequence of the great resemblance of two persons. 1 Hall's Am. Law Journ. 70; 1 Beck's Med. Jur. 509; 1 Paris, Med. Jur, 222; 3 Id. 143; Trail. Med. Jur. 33; Fodere, Med. Leg. ch. 2, tome 1, p. 78-139.
     3. In cases of larceny, trover, replevin, and the like, the things in dispute must always be identified. Vide 4 Bl. Com. 396.
     4. M. Briand, in his Manuel Complet de Medicine Legale, 4eme partie, ch. 1, gives rules for the discovery of particular marks, which an individual may have had, and also the true color of the hair, although it may have been artificially colored. He also gives some rules for the purpose of discovering, from the appearance of a skeleton, the sex, the age, and the height of the person when living, which he illustrates by various examples. See, generally, 6 C. & P 677; 1 C. & M. 730; 3 Tyr. 806; Shelf. on Mar. & Div. 226; 1 Hagg. Cons. R. 189; Best on Pres. Appx. case 4; Wills on Circums. Ev. 143, et seq.

References in periodicals archive ?
away from the thus far known world of ego identity. "Despite its
To understand further the correlations among the variables, we evaluated whether or not there was a relationship between referral program involvement and ego identity. The results revealed that three canonical correlations were significant.
Both raters were blind to measures of the participants' parental attachment, religiosity, and ego identity status.
Development and validation of the Ego Identity Process Questionnaire.
Ego identity is a key concept of Erikson's (1964, 1968, 1980) theory, and refers to a psychological construct composed of components or dimensions that are dynamically integrated and gradually change with age and experience.
developing and testing a model of ethnic identity development that is (1) theoretically based on Erickson's (1964, 1968) writings, (2) congruent both with Marcia's (1980) ego identity statuses and with the models of ethnic identity in the literature, and (3) applicable across ethnic groups.
Revised classification criteria for the Extended Objective Measure of Ego Identity Status (EOMEIS).
Ego identity status and reported alcohol consumption: a study of first-year college students.
All of these questions allowed us to contemplate the impact of social oppression and racist ideology on the ego identity of minority clients.