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official

1) adj. an act, document or anything sanctioned or authorized by a public official or public agency. The term can also apply to an organizational act or product which is authorized by the organization, such as an Official Boy Scout knife or emblem, an official warranty, membership card, or set of rules. 2) n. a public officer or governmental employee who is empowered to exercise judgment. 3) n. an officer of a corporation or business. (See: officer)

official

adjective accredited, approved, assured, attested, authenticated, authoritative, ceremonious, certain, certified, conclusive, correct, decided, definite, dependable, endorsed, established, formal, guaranteed, indisputable, legitimate, licensed, magisterial, officiary, proper, proven, publicus, reliable, sanctioned, to be depended on, to be trusted, trustworthy, undeniable, unequivocal, valid, verified, worthy of confidence
Associated concepts: official act, official bond, official busiiess, official misconduct, official notice, official proceeding, official record

official

noun administrative head, administrator, executive, executive officer, functionary, head of government, leader, leader of affairs, office bearer, officer, overseer, person in authority, person reeponsible, public office holder, superintendent, supervisor
Associated concepts: public official
See also: actual, certain, choate lien, civic, clerk, ex officio, factual, fixed, formal, functionary, genuine, incumbent, indubious, legitimate, magistrate, notary public, officer, politician, rightful, valid

OFFICIAL, civil and canon laws. In the ancient civil law, the person who was the minister of, or attendant upon a magistrate, was called the official.
     2. In the canon law, the person to whom the bishop generally commits the charge of his spiritual jurisdiction, bears this name. Wood's Inst. 30, 505; Merl. Repert. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lastly, Facebook added "District Targeting," which allows elected officials to target specific posts and messages to people who are likely their constituents.
By making contacts and meeting with your elected officials in several ways, you can become a trusted advisor when legislation is being considered.
It would apply to local elected officials and members of the State Board of Education.
Elected officials are tapped into the pulse of the community and can engage constituents and rally support, however they often must take positions on political issues and often do not know or are not connected with the economic development process, on the other hand, staff have historical knowledge and critical data and information.
Developed to maximize the voice of the association's 17,000-plus members, Advocacy Day 2000 seeks to build upon the pre-existing relationship BOMA members currently enjoy with their elected officials.
According to the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, state law requires that all town employees, elected or not, who work 20 hours or more per week must be offered health insurance, but a town or city "may, at its discretion, offer health insurance to elected officials who work less than 20 hours per week.
A number of strategies emerged from the discussion, including routinely informing elected officials about economic activities, as well as making better use of the existing skills sets and backgrounds of elected officials.
The local plan developed by the workforce investment board is a public document and every elected official has the right to review and comment on the plan.
Elections and Voting: Find your elected official, register to vote, find where to vote, absentee ballot information, and more.
West Hollywood City Councilmember Jeffrey Prang, an openly-gay elected official, was recently installed as the President of California Contract Cities Association, another statewide municipal agency representing more than 80 cities that contract for many municipal services such as police, fire, and public works.
It took the attention of the news media and an elected official to get the DWP to put the problem on its ``to do'' list.
But how does an elected official balance the roles of catalyst and convener with the roles of problem-solver and leader?