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Letter to the Editor (July 26, 2017) concerning the paper "Impact of electromagnetic radiation emitted by monitors on changes in the cellular membrane structure and protective antioxidant effect of vitamin A--In vitro study".
As well as repelling electromagnetic radiation, the unique Wireless Armour fabric is also antibacterial, shape holding and can be laundered in a conventional washing machine.
By comparison, it can be seen from Figure 4 that the frictional energy of method 3 generates constantly and obviously in the loading process, which is in better accordance with the laboratory test result of electromagnetic radiation (Figure 5).
Atermic effect of electromagnetic radiation, specifically to low-intensity emissions from mobile phones, radios, radar, etc.
* Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance (HERO), Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Personnel, and Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Fuel shall be mitigated prior to the conduct of all military exercises, operations, and activities.
X-rays are a highly energetic form of electromagnetic radiation. They easily pass through soft particles in the human body, but when the rays hit denser material, such as bone or metal, they are stopped and absorbed.
of Cartagena, Spain) has written this textbook on high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry for researchers, engineers and students who are concerned with the effects of electromagnetic radiation on human health.
Some scientists believe the electromagnetic radiation produced by phone masts can cause cancer, fatigue and migraines in people living and working nearby.
European researchers studied one of his paintings, called Patch of Gross, using superstrong, focused beams of X-rays (high-energy waves of electromagnetic radiation).
Their brains are still developing, and their thinner skulls leave them more vulnerable to electromagnetic radiation.
Every time you talk on a cell phone, microwave a bag of popcorn, or turn on a lamp to read, you rely on electromagnetic radiation (see sidebar: "Understanding Electromagnetic Radiation").
SNAFU is worried that San Francisco is "already immersed in a sea of electromagnetic radiation" from, among other sources, some 2,500 licensed cell phone antennas at 530 locations around the city.

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