eleemosynary


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eleemosynary

(eh-luh-moss-uh-nary) adj. charitable, as applied to a purpose or institution.

See: benevolent, charitable, donative, nonprofit, philanthropic

eleemosynary

for the relief of want; alms-giving; charity.

ELEEMOSYNARY. Charitable alms-giving.
     2. Eleemosynary corporations are colleges, schools, and hospitals. 1 Wood. Lect. 474; Skinn. 447 1 Lord Raym. 5 2 T. R. 346.

References in periodicals archive ?
For Marshall, chartered corporations included not only private commercial corporations and eleemosynary corporations, but also cities and the United States government itself.
The Labor Department's regulation stated: "Activities of eleemosynary, religious, or educational organization[s] may be performed for a business purpose" and therefore treats those "ordinary commercial activities" the same as "when they are performed by the ordinary business enterprise.
Through their eleemosynary efforts, MEPS members will feel good about themselves and will contribute to a service-oriented community ethos of which they can be proud.
26) Caesarius gives 30 as the minimum age for diaconal ordination, and delineates the deacon's eleemosynary duties.
We were not an eleemosynary organisation," he told the US daily.
None of its counterparties were lulled into thinking that they were dealing with an eleemosynary institution.
70) Texas law, for example, indicates that "a person who is an inmate in a penal institution or who is an involuntary inmate in a hospital or eleemosynary [charitable] institution does not, while an inmate, acquire residence at the place where the institution is located.
In a block grant, the federal government says, in effect, "Here, have back some of the money we took from you in taxes, but use it for eleemosynary purposes that you and/or your state government will determine.
According to the Texas Election Code, "A person who is an inmate in a penal institution or who is an involuntary inmate in a hospital or eleemosynary institution does not, while an inmate, acquire residence at the place where the institution is located.
The office of the University Visitor 'has a long tradition', (37) with its origins in ecclesiastical law; it has evolved with the development of eleemosynary corporations, 'particularly the colleges within the universities of Oxford and Cambridge in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries'.
There are other problems with eAPIS not covered by Lee Smith's article ("Over the Line With eAPIS," December 2009 IFR) that those of us who fly into Mexico for an eleemosynary purpose have encountered.