embankment

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See: bulwark
References in classic literature ?
The dynamite had dug a ditch more than a hundred feet wide, all around us, and cast up an embankment some twenty-five feet high on both borders of it.
As soon as it was good and dark, I shut off the current from all the fences, and then groped my way out to the embankment bordering our side of the great dynamite ditch.
Seriously," said Gondy, astonished at not having further advanced; "I fear that when the torrent has broken its embankment it will cause fearful destruction.
The Grand Trunk at this point was built on an embankment to guard against winter floods from the foothills, so that one walked, as it were, a little above the country, along a stately corridor, seeing all India spread out to left and right.
That is why--" Here he stopped himself, and they began to walk slowly along the Embankment, the moon fronting them.
You may come of the oldest family in Devonshire, but that's no reason why you should mind being seen alone with me on the Embankment.
Now and then he sat on the benches in Piccadilly and towards morning he strolled down to The Embankment.
After watching the traffic on the Embankment for a minute or two with a stoical gaze she twitched her husband's sleeve, and they crossed between the swift discharge of motor cars.
He implied that one ought not to sit out on Chelsea Embankment without a male escort.
Slow footsteps, coming down the side of the railroad embankment, alarmed him ere he could drink.
On the night of his arrival in London, Alexander went immediately to the hotel on the Embankment at which he always stopped, and in the lobby he was accosted by an old acquaintance, Maurice Mainhall, who fell upon him with effusive cordiality and indicated a willingness to dine with him.
With the crashing of glass, the splitting of timber - a hideous, tearing sound - the wrecked saloon, dragging the engine half-way over with it, slipped down a low embankment and lay on its side, what remained of it, in a field of turnips.