emigrant


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See: alien

EMIGRANT. One who quits his country for any lawful reason, with a design to settle elsewhere, and who takes his family and property, if he has any, with him. Vatt. b. 1, c. 19, Sec. 224.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, there are exceptions; for example, if a Yemeni emigrant student graduates from secondary school with an average grade of more than 90 percent, he or she will be allowed to attend a Saudi university; otherwise, the student either must attend a private university in Saudi or return to his own country to continue his university studies.
27 with a 140-pic program focusing on the port city's history as one of Europe's most important points of departure for 19th and 20th century emigrants.
The three-TD group will be led by the party's emigrant affairs spokesman, Paul Connaughton, and includes community affairs spokesman Dinny McGinley and party whip Paul Kehoe.
Scores of people who left the village for Europe were at the Festival of Emigrants and plaques were also given to the oldest emigrants in Germany and Australia.
He discusses their powers and responsibilities, the improvements they gradually made to managing emigrant health, incidents of disease and quarantine, and punishments meted out to surgeon superintendents deemed to have failed in their responsibilities.
At this time he had already begun his own "missionary" work, namely, to educate preachers for the German emigrants in North America.
He added: "The McCain-Kennedy Bill, currently passing through the US Congress, offers a lifeline to effect change in the US emigrant regime.
More than any other example of assisted emigration, in fact, the schemes of the poor law unions prove to Moran that Irish emigration, when well-planned, could be successful and beneficial to both emigrant and host country.
Emigrant Homecomings: The Return Movement of Emigrants, 1600-2000.
For example, Lebanon has been an emigrant culture for a long time, and its cultural artifacts feature subjects that may be rare elsewhere.
Finally, Moran's study is truly transnational in scope, concentrating on assisted emigrants to Canada (their primary initial destination) and to the United States, but also providing information about emigrant assistance to Australasia, South Africa, and England.