Emigration

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Emigration

Emigration is the act of leaving one's country to live somewhere else. These men emigrated from Italy to the United States in 1911. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Emigration is the act of leaving one's country to live somewhere else. These men emigrated from Italy to the United States in 1911.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The act of moving from one country to another with intention not to return. It is to be distinguished from expatriation, which means the Abandonment of one's country and renunciation of one's citizenship in it, while emigration denotes merely the removal of person and property to another country. Expatriation is usually the consequence of emigration. Emigration is also sometimes used in reference to the removal from one section to another of the same country.

EMIGRATION. The act of removing from one place to another. It is sometimes used in the same sense as expatriation, (q.v.) but there is some difference in the signification. Expatriation is the act of abandoning one's country, while emigration is, perhaps not strictly, applied to the act of removing from one part of the country to another. Vide 2 Kent, Com. 36.

References in periodicals archive ?
She establishes numbers and distinctions crucial for comparative studies of French and Altantic emigrations. In place of static images of the old orders in France and Canada, she offers a dynamic portrait of capitalist penetration and associated migrations of peoples.
In accord with recent research in France and Canada, it redefines French emigration to Canada and French-Canadian society.
The total French emigration to Canada numbered around 67,000 people but with seasonal migration included could have received as many as 75,000 in the two centuries of her study
In both popular media and in mainstream academic scholarship, the Jackson-Vanik amendment--which linked Soviet-American trade relations to the question of Soviet Jewish emigration--is portrayed as a largely successful effort to facilitate Jewish emigration. This article sheds light on a revisionist perspective, focusing on the debates over the amendment's effectiveness that took place between the amendment's passage in Congress and the USSR's final years.
(1) Decades after the fall of the Soviet Union and the emigration of over a million Jews, the American Jewish community typically recalls the amendment as a moment of triumph.
Italian emigration back then was mainly associated with the flight of researchers, scientists and other highly skilled professionals attracted by the chance for better careers abroad.
Now, 20 years later, Italian emigration has grown exponentially.
The primary focus is Soviet compliance with the family reunification and emigration provisions of the Helsinki Final Act of 1975 and subsequent CSCE agreements.
The pattern of Soviet compliance with the family reunification and emigration provisions of CSCE documents provides an opportunity for empirical analysis of regime compliance.