enfeoff


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enfeoff

to invest with possession of a freehold estate in land.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

TO ENFEOFF. To make a gift of any corporeal hereditaments to another. Vide Feoffment.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
He for whose benefit another person is enfeoffed or seised of land or tenements, or is possessed of personal property.
In a month equivalent to February 1453, the Chinese court sent envoys to offer sacrifices for the deceased ruler named Sri Borommarachathirat, and to enfeoff his son "Ba-luo Lan-mi-sun-la" [CHINESE CHARACTER NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as the "king of the country of Siam".
Alternatively, Nakano Takayuki understands the phrase to mean "serving as ruler of one of the many states enfeoffed by the Tang." See Suzuki Yasutami; et al., eds., Yakuchu Nihon kodai no gaiko monjo (Tokyo: Yagi Shoten, 2014), 38.
The tenant-in-chief thus provided his own retainers with a fee (they were thus enfeoffed) to support them.
The difficulty is that the author does not like capitalism, to which they are enfeoffed. He makes it clear early (page 8, in fact): "This book will show that I do not like capitalism." He does, however, like business, a point he also makes clear.
But Grimsby over-reached himself, and enfeoffed (legally handed over to) a third party with the land.
(39) In the south especially, the Nguyen expressed their will of emancipation from the North by placing themselves under the aegis of Buddhist spirits not enfeoffed to the Thang-long court.
On the other hand, although Chancery began to establish its jurisdiction over uses in the 1370s, it was not until 1439 that beneficiaries of a will made by someone whose lands stood enfeoffed to use gained any kind of remedy in the case of defaulting feoffees.(14) When feoffees did carry out their responsibilities and land was sold in the absence of direct heirs, the end result was usually to disinherit more distant relatives, such as nephews, nieces or cousins.
Ke, prince of Jian and son of Xianzong, was the ancestor of the first ruler [xianzhu, i.e., Li Bian], Ke was enfeoffed in the first year of the Yuanhe era [806].
He was made marklord of Xu, for generations enfeoffed, passing down this charisma.
There followed a succession of titles, and by mid-October Cao Cao had been named General-in-chief (da jiangjun by the young emperor and enfeoffed as Marquis of Wuping.
In his decree he said that his intention to do so was made clear when he appointed Cao Pi the Central Commander of Five Guards, because, except for Cao Pi, all his other children were enfeoffed. See "Li Taizi ling" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], in Cao Cao ji yizhu, 173.