engagement

(redirected from engagements)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to engagements: Engagement rings

Engagement

A binding, pledging, or coming together. A mutual pact, contract, or agreement.

An engagement to marry is a Bilateral Contract between two people whereby they mutually promise to marry one another. Formerly, a breach of the engagement to marry was a Cause of Action in several jurisdictions, but this is not true today.

An engagement letter is a clear delineation of an agreement that covers a particular project or employment. An attorney can require a client to sign such a letter to indicate that the person has been employed to perform specifically designated tasks.

engagement

in English law, an agreement, albeit unenforceable, to marry at some future date. The agreement is usually marked by the man giving the woman an engagement ring. This gift is presumed to be absolute, so that if the marriage does not take place the woman may keep the ring; this presumption may be rebutted, however, by proof that the ring was given on condition that the marriage took place. Also an unenforceable agreement in Scotland.

ENGAGEMENT. This word is frequently used in the French law to signify not only a contract, but the obligations arising from a quasi contract. The terms obligations (q.v.) and engagements, are said to be synonymous 17 Toull. n. 1; but the Code seems specially to apply the term engagement to those obligations which the law, imposes on a man without the intervention of any contract, either on the part of the obligor or the obligee. Art. 1370.

References in classic literature ?
"Yes, for I am unable to keep my engagement with you.
THE narrative returns to South Morden, and follows the events which attended Isabel's marriage engagement.
We shall have great difficulty in finding persons of character and capacity to accept a temporary engagement of that sort, if we try in London.
May you never know what my withdrawal from our engagement has cost me!
She was persuaded to believe the engagement a wrong thing: indiscreet, improper, hardly capable of success, and not deserving it.
"--or if she had wanted to marry the man who calls for Carter Paterson, I should have said the same." Then, with one of those turns that convinced her aunt that she was not mad really and convinced observers of another type that she was not a barren theorist, she added: "Though in the case of Carter Paterson I should want it to be a very long engagement indeed, I must say."
If he knows her engagement, what can he mean by his behaviour?"
Papa was not a rock: he had no other fixity than that fixity of alternating impulses sometimes called habit, and this was altogether unfavorable to his taking the only decisive line of conduct in relation to his daughter's engagement--namely, to inquire thoroughly into Lydgate's circumstances, declare his own inability to furnish money, and forbid alike either a speedy marriage or an engagement which must be too lengthy.
Fairlie for your departure, before the end of your engagement, must be that an unforeseen necessity compels you to ask his permission to return at once to London.
Lady Catherine might see him in her way through town; and his engagement to Bingley of coming again to Netherfield must give way.
As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement
There has been a solemn engagement between them ever since Octoberformed at Weymouth, and kept a secret from every body.