enter

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Enter

To form a constituent part; to become a part or partaker; to penetrate; share or mix with, as tin enters into the composition of pewter. To go or come into a place or condition; to make or effect an entrance; to cause to go into or be received into.

In the law of real property, to go upon land for the purpose of taking possession of it. In strict usage, the entering is preliminary to the taking possession but in common parlance the entry is now merged in the taking possession.

To place anything before a court, or upon or among the records, in a formal and regular manner, and usually in writing as in to enter an appearance, or to enter a judgment. In this sense the word is nearly equivalent to setting down formally in writing, in either a full or abridged form.

enter

(Go in), verb arrive, board, come in, cross the threshold, effect an entrance, gain admittance, gain entry, go into, inire, intrare, introire, make an entrance, pass into, set foot in, step in, walk in
Associated concepts: breaking and entering, forcible entry, immigration, lawful entry, open and peaceable entry

enter

(Insert), verb implant, infuse, inject, intercalate, interject, interpose, introduce, intromit, place into, put in, stick in

enter

(Penetrate), verb bore, cut into, cut through, drill, empierce, gore, impale, infiltrate, interpenetrate, lance, perforate, pervade, pierce, prick, puncture, sink into, stab, transpierce

enter

(Record), verb catalogue, check in, chronicle, enroll, file, inscribe, inscroll, jot down, list, log, make an entry, mark down, note, place in the record, post, put down, put in writing, put on record, referre, register, set down, tabulate, take down, transcribe, write down, write in
Associated concepts: entered on the record, entry of a judgment
See also: book, compete, embark, enroll, file, impanel, inscribe, introduce, join, note, penetrate, pervade, record, register, set down
References in periodicals archive ?
The trial ends when the jury comes back into the courtroom and delivers its verdict and it is read aloud in court, and then entered upon the minutes.
Some states, however, require a judgment entered upon a stipulation to comply with the same procedures as a judgment entered upon confession.
The system automatically builds their show based on their personal profile entered upon sign up.
Over the past decade, Kung has been prodding people worldwide to acknowledge that we have entered upon a new historical epoch, that we are confronted with a fundamental world crisis of interrelated dimensions - economic, political, ecological - whose proportions and character have never before been experienced.
Another is that they somehow also defeated a soft but pernicious proto-communism at home in the form of a bureaucratized welfare state--even though the government's share of GDP in both Britain and the United States was the same when they left office as it had been when they entered upon it.
My point is, however, that some such discussion needs to be entered upon if one intends to say anything useful about his 'thought'.
In an article for the American Federationist, Gompers argued that "regulation of industrial relations is not a policy to be entered upon lightly -- establishment of regulation for one type of relation necessitates regulating of another, until finally all industrial life grows rigid with regulation.
Speaker Dacquay ruled the motion out of order as Manitoba's rules require that a motion to adjourn the House may not be moved until the Orders of the Day had been entered upon.
It entered upon a "tremendous conflict" with traditional Judeo-Christian cultural values.
Kensington designed a security lock for point-of-purchase displays, and there is even a software system that will activate a security office if a special PIN number hasn't been entered upon using the device.
During the same year, Coleridge became acquainted with Wordsworth; together they entered upon one of the most influential creative periods of English literature.