epiphany

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epiphany

noun comprehension, contemplation, disclosure, divine inspiration, divine revelation, expression, innovation, manifestation, meaning, mystical experience, mystical intuition, prophecy, prophetic, remarkable idea, revelation, revolutionary idea, revolutionnry solution, understanding
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Such epiphanic glimmerings make their subjects pilgrims who embark on a journey to listen to nature, not just to observe it, and to bring individual and societal behavior in harmony with its rhythms.
However, a persistent critical fascination with those illuminating moments of revelation and intense personal experience in this literature that have been defined as epiphanic, he argues, has resulted in the neglect of the "epideictic" function characteristic of Low Modernist texts.
The principal leitmotif of this crystallization, as Read convincingly underscores, was light, an epiphanic light "refracted throughout the text" and which, Read explains, originated in a comment by Picasso in conversation with Apollinaire: "'I love light above all else.
5] As an imaginary script, this exchange functions as yet another embedded text, one in which Flip works out his guilt and, through his epiphanic decision, aligns himself finally with all that Gunther represents: wealth, prestige, and rising above one's background.
It's not that they aren't eager for the epiphanic experience; it's that in the company of women, men don't want to be ordered to sing, to say stuff, or to give anything.
In a new book, provocatively titled The Case for Islamo-Christian Civilization, one of those critics, Columbia scholar Richard Bulliet, argues that Lewis has been getting his "master narrative" about the Islamic world wrong since his early epiphanic days in Turkey--and he's still getting it wrong today.
Like you, I've read this brand of epiphanic, rhapsodic tell-all too many times.
In Janice's relationship with her unswervingly Socialist and pro-Stalinist first husband, Sam Find, this epiphanic moment becomes "emblematic" and occasions "the first cut of hatred for him," so that "She felt paralyzed" and unable to respond to his attentions (p.
Evoking the literary trope of the synecdoche, in which a part expresses the whole, this moment is epiphanic, an 'ecstasy' (p.
It had no rituals, no deities, no sacred objects, no elaborate doctrines, no epiphanic revelations, miracles, possessions, or visitations.
As she writes in the book's preface, "this book will argue [that] Joyce moves steadily away from the early concern with epiphanic self-revelation to an obsessive celebration of selfhood as imposture and sham--and as an ultimately unknowable entity" (xi).