epiphany

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epiphany

noun comprehension, contemplation, disclosure, divine inspiration, divine revelation, expression, innovation, manifestation, meaning, mystical experience, mystical intuition, prophecy, prophetic, remarkable idea, revelation, revolutionary idea, revolutionnry solution, understanding
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In particular, I advance three specific claims about the role of epiphany and epiphanic situations in the genre: first, the novelists draw upon a literary tradition of describing what is at heart a religious experience by using and adapting a well-established set of epiphanic protocols in Greek literature and culture; second, these epiphanic situations are an integral part of the novels' generic self-definition and, as such, they are remolded and reshaped by different authors to suit their individual narrative strategies; third, epiphany's emphasis on sight and recognition is implicated with other concerns that have been recognized as central to the novelists' projects, namely their interest in visual representation, personal identity, and the narration of the marvelous.
From Bachelard, I derive three basic components of epiphanic patterns: elements (in the ancient sense: earth, air, fire, water); patterns of motion (irrespective of whatever it is tha t moves); and shapes (most commonly, geometric), together with certain recurrent features that are occasionally linked to the above (thus, in one Salinger epiphany the color green is linked to earth in springtime, but patches of bright, pure color appear often, without requiring any "elemental" cause).
Here it becomes epiphanic because it is the sign that although he has come back to be cared for by family, he secretly spits on their world.
And yet this sets the ground for relevance and sympathy, and Tayo's epiphanic vision bespeaks an interconnectedness across the Pacific.
On the day of that epiphanic home run in 1960, my father, a millwright on the Open Hearth at Edgar Thomson Steel Works in Braddock, the first steel mill that Andrew Carnegie erected in the United States, was six days away from his forty-fifth birthday.
Memory, experienced as a series of epiphanic moments, is no longer experienced as linear as it used to be in childhood, but instead corresponds with Virginia Woolf's 'moments of being' (3):
But Schillings' epiphanic moment, when he decided that he would give anything in the world to become a DJ, came in the ' 70s when he was watching a Jackson 5ive cartoon, which was a fictionalised portrayal of the careers of Motown recording group The Jackson 5.
Whistled Language Loves Her Lamb Last night I dreamt in Braille Each letter a dirigible Over which God's nimble Fingers do the walking Me talking you up proper, rollicky & as epiphanic as teacher's W-A-T-E-R Pressed into the excitable palm I want to be your personal Rosetta Stone Interpret this world for you through Love Chiseled in granite so that even when You're feeling blind with unknowing You can reach right out And run your long, your golden Holy Romans Over this solid, this lasting blessing
may not have produced any epiphanic moments, but it did provide numerous stakeholders--FDA officials, lawmakers, device company executives, industry professionals, consultants and other interested parties--the opportunity to discuss strengths and weaknesses of the process and possible changes being considered.
This image of open and epiphanic space has been made by the artist Eva Stenram through using NASA's digital images of Mars, converted into negatives and left in her bedroom to collect dust, before carefully printing them.
He aspires to write in a demotic, candid, epiphanic style, creating a poetic vernacular for his unabashedly philosophical subjects.
In Coetzee's work, the (be)coming of meaning, or coming-to-meaning is a process that draws on the idiom and imagery of the messianic, the epiphanic, the revelatory, yet deferring its revelations, declining its authority and brooding instead on the "conditions of messengerhood" (Coetzee 1992: 340).