episode


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episode

noun chapter, circumstance, event, happening, incident, occasion, occurrence, sequel, short-lived event, sudden event
See also: event, experience, happening, incident, occasion, occurrence, scene
References in classic literature ?
Nothing in the world could be more done with than that episode.
Simon has been thrown into the greatest consternation by the strange and painful episodes which have taken place in connection with his wedding.
Griffiths was taken aback at the fire he had aroused, for he had found his two days with her in the country somewhat tedious; and he had no desire to turn an amusing episode into a tiresome affair.
All present stood rooted to the earth with amazement at this unexpected and apparently uncalled-for outbreak; but the poor prince's painful and rambling speech gave rise to a strange episode.
He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
It is always the particular soul, and the particular act or episode, as the flower of the particular soul--the act or episode by which its quality comes to the test--in which he interests us.
The episode meant more to him than being bested in play by the best swordsman in England--for that surely was no disgrace--to Henry it seemed prophetic of the outcome of a future struggle when he should stand face to face with the real De Montfort; and then, seeing in De Vac only the creature of his imagination with which he had vested the likeness of his powerful brother-in-law, Henry did what he should like to have done to the real Leicester.
The momentary depression occasioned by the dramatic little episode of a few minutes ago, seemed already to have passed from the girl's manner.
The episode with Makovkina had occurred after five years of his hermit life.
Tudor had always been a wanderer, and with facile wit and quick vivid description he leaped from episode and place to episode and place, relating his experiences seemingly not because they were his, but for the sake of their bizarreness and uniqueness, for the unusual incident or the laughable situation.
Woodford concluded his account of the episode with a statement to the effect: "What especially struck me was the absence of pain and terror in their faces, which seemed to express, rather, serenity and repose"--this, mind you, of men and women of his own race whom he knew well and who had sat at dinner with him in his own house.
So the Wilcox episode fell into the background, leaving behind it memories of sweetness and horror that mingled, and the sisters pursued the life that Helen had commended.