equivocate


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Although Edmonds and Eidinow equivocate, conventional philosophers side with Popper, unconventional ones with Wittgenstein.
StarLedger's critic doesn't equivocate, saying, '"Little Women' is a must-see for mothers and daughters
The personifications of Larguesza (Largesse), Proessa (Prowess [in love]), and Merce (Mercy [as the elusive reward of love]) similarly equivocate between grammatical gender and semantic gender.
Central to her spiritual development was Morata's experience of life at court in Ferrara under the reluctant expatriate Renee de France, who gathered around her a circle of mainly French religious exiles and continued to equivocate about her religious affiliation until she was imprisoned and forced to recant all Protestant beliefs in 1554.
These writers were not afraid to make big statements about a big country, whereas contemporary American writers equivocate due to a dire need for objectivity.
They may wonder about the effectiveness of outreach efforts that omit or equivocate about so important a topic and, thus, forgo the opportunity to educate people about the ongoing, cumulative damage to abortion rights.
Likewise, Liberal leader Jean Chretien and Progressive Conservative Party leader Joe Clark equivocate on gay rights and favour pro-choice policies on abortion, even as they, like Fry, profess to remain Christians and Catholics.
The Globe will not equivocate in abiding by the highest journalistic standards and ethics.
18), and he proceeds to explain why nature in Aristotle is allowed to equivocate, failing to note that in the present case equivocating about the nature of nature forces us to equivocate on the distinction between female and slave.
Chomsky and Herman did equivocate, however: "We do not pretend to know where the truth lies amidst these sharply conflicting assessments," they wrote.
Characters wino may equivocate to some degree eventually pledge allegiance to a cause they find to be both just and right.
The authors equivocate, however, on whether exactions are equitable and efficient solutions.