erode

(redirected from erodable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

erode

verb abrade, break down, consume, decay, deteriorate, diminish, disintegrate, dissolve, file, gradually eat away, grind, lessen, lose, make thin, rasp, reduce, rub away, scrape, shrink, strip, waste, weaken, wear, wear away, wear down, wear down by friccion, weather
Associated concepts: erode the credibility of a witness
See also: degenerate, depreciate, diminish, impair, lessen
References in periodicals archive ?
Controlled studies were conducted in western Washington and central California on highly erodable loam soils.
During the planning stage, identify critically erodable areas and plan to avoid disturbing them.
63), and DNA has been encapsulated in microspheres of an erodable biopolymer called PLG, then successfully fed to mice (SN: 5/11/96, p.
5 percent of America's population, and since the 1930s, when drought exacerbated the practice of growing wheat on highly erodable land and led to the Dust Bowl, most of these people have lived in cities.
One area of particular success has been the "swampbuster" and "sodbuster" provisions written into the 1990 Farm Bill, which penalize farmers for conversion of wetlands to fields, as well as for plowing steep, highly erodable ground.
Once a kimberlite target was found it then required confirmation of its diamond potential by collecting down-ice heavy mineral samples in the search for the very important indicator minerals (the more readily erodable kimberlite would have been gouged out by the westward moving glacial ice).
Coarse nonerodable aggregates can be transformed into fine erodable aggregates by water and tillage practices.
Steep slopes and/or highly erodable soils speed the process.
The CRP targets highly erodable land or land that if used improperly might degrade water quality, and is administered by the CFSA with NRCS technical help.
Caraco, 2001, "Human Impact on Erodable Phosphorus and Eutrophication: A Global Perspective," BioScience 51:227-234
Increasing global reforestation between now and the year 2000 by an area nearly twice the size of Texas could not only return the world's supply of wood for fuel and industry to a sustainable level, but also help stabilize watersheds and highly erodable, wind-prone areas, according to Sandra Postel and Lori Heise of the Washington, D.