establishment

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A ship was to be sent annually from New York to this main establishment with reinforcements and supplies, and with merchandise suited to the trade.
This circumstance had suggested to him the idea of supplying the Russian establishment regularly by means of the annual ship that should visit the settlement at the mouth of the Columbia (or Oregon) ; by this means the casual trading vessels would be excluded from those parts of the coast where their malpractices were so injurious to the Russians.
He considered his projected establishment at the mouth of the Columbia as the emporium to an immense commerce; as a colony that would form the germ of a wide civilization; that would, in fact, carry the American population across the Rocky Mountains and spread it along the shores of the Pacific, as it already animated the shores of the Atlantic.
His main establishment once planted at the mouth of the Columbia, he looked with confidence to ultimate success.
Astor to be his chief agent, and to represent him in the contemplated establishment.
An agent, appointed for the term of five years, was to reside at the principal establishment on the northwest coast, and Wilson Price Hunt was the one chosen for the first term.
The proposition alluded to was the one, already mentioned, for the establishment of an American Fur Company in the Atlantic States.
If, on the contrary, Britain had been situated on the continent, and had been compelled, as she would have been, by that situation, to make her military establishments at home coextensive with those of the other great powers of Europe, she, like them, would in all probability be, at this day, a victim to the absolute power of a single man.
Extensive military establishments cannot, in this position, be necessary to our security.
Next to the effectual establishment of the Union, the best possible precaution against danger from standing armies is a limitation of the term for which revenue may be appropriated to their support.
Had the argument from the British example been truly stated, it would have stood thus: The term for which supplies may be appropriated to the army establishment, though unlimited by the British Constitution, has nevertheless, in practice, been limited by parliamentary discretion to a single year.
There are native tanners, shoemakers, weavers, blacksmiths, stonecutters, and other artificers attached to each establishment.

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