evenhanded justice

See: fairness, right
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Al-Sama'ani pointed out that the opening of these specialised courts would positively impact the specialised and evenhanded justice system, whose substance and process were derived from Islamic law and effective regulations.
Al-Sama'ani pointed out that the opening of these specialized courts would positively impact the specialized and evenhanded justice system, whose substance and process were derived from Islamic law and effective regulations; this would uphold people's rights and ensure a sound business environment full of trust and stability.
Palafox, by contrast, believed that the monarchy could more effectively preserve its subjects' loyalty if it respected the integrity of the diverse regional governments under its sway: evenhanded justice, administered in ways tailored to specific regions within the empire, would encourage subjects to cooperate with their king.
Such a tribunal would have domestic and international legitimacy and could be capable of insuring evenhanded justice. Authorized by the UN Security Council and with the participation of judges from around the world, including key Muslim nations as well as some Iraqis, this tribunal might be able not only to insure justice to the victims of Saddam but also to hold the United States accountable for its sordid record and make it more difficult to rewrite the history of the 2003 Iraq war.
In the aftermath of 11 September, there was a determinedly optimistic reaction by some that the horrific shockwaves would revive foundations for wider international co-operation not just behind the immediate and specific responses to the terrorists through the UN Security Council and otherwise, but across broader and interaction, the pursuit of evenhanded justice, arms control, environmental stewardship and the like.
An April 23, 2001 letter to the editor of the New York Times identifies her (along with the letter's co-author, Mitchell Zimmerman) as one of the "coordinators of Law Professors for the Rule of Law." (6) The text of that letter, which was addressed to the very different subject of the influence of the Federalist Society, is included here for the sake of completeness: Once upon a time, judges were not political animals who thought first about how to advance their political views, and people who carne before them expected evenhanded justice ("A Conservative Legal Group Thrives in Bush's Washington," front page, April 18).
The judge "did not pretend that he was dispensing evenhanded justice. There were no long-winded rationales for his judgments.
If left to fester, public misinformation can endanger the ability of our courts to mete out evenhanded justice as "havens of refuge for those who might otherwise suffer because they are helpless, weak, [and] outnumbered...." (Justice Hugo Black, Chambers v.