evenhandedness


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It is worth noting that Du Bois's evenhandedness, which Benjamin repeatedly praises, is sometimes more rhetorical than real.
Given the evenhandedness of Watt's argument up to this point, it's difficult to dispute this conclusion that inasmuch as Bible-carrying Christian congregations object to the dominance of states and markets, their existence is valuable.
In fact, in certain contexts the pursuit of fairness (as evenhandedness) may even make it a moral requirement.
This evenhandedness, this ability to see the point of both sides in a dispute, and this refusal to get carried away by the slo ganeering and intellectual grandstanding of the day is, as I was to find out, practically the defining feature of all of Wrong's work.
May I suggest that the siege is in the minds of American officials and apologists for Israel who willfully persist in blaming the victim, in finding a false symmetry between occupier and occupied, in adopting a double standard on the value of human lives and rights while totally dehumanizing the Palestinians, in treating Israel as a country above the law and Palestinians as a people not worthy of the protection of the law, in manipulating and inventing a peace process that would accommodate such a racist and stereotypical version of reality rather than a reality of justice and evenhandedness, and in evading and distorting moral responsibility toward the Palestinian victims rather than celebrating the violence of the oppressor.
Schaffer's central finding is that poorly educated Wolof speakers understand demokaraasi as mutuality, emphasizing consensus, solidarity, and evenhandedness rather than the concepts he takes to be central to democracy, namely, widespread participation in governance, emphasizing meaningful choices, inclusivity, and the relative irrelevance of economic and social inequalities in political participation (pp.
Continued Cohn, "In sum, fairly read and understood, the State of Ohio has adopted a motto which crosses the line from evenhandedness toward all religions, to a preference for Christianity, in the form of Christian text.
In addition, a CEO should expect the fairness opinion advisor to inform him or her as early as possible of any issues regarding the evenhandedness of the transaction, preventing a deepening disaster later on.
The complexity of the inter-Reformed debates of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries are treated with deft evenhandedness. The author places the ecumenical challenge squarely, a challenge that can be taken to heart by non-Reformed Christians as well: "To allow for real new departures, a new sense of communion needs to be born -- not to kill diversity but to relate churches to one another through a new commitment to mutual understanding and communication."
224-25, 232) By contrast, she describes the later shift of child-abuse experts away from that "culpable victim model" in invidious terms: by the early 1980s, she writes, "the flames of liberal sexuality" had been "entirely extinguished"; one specialist in particular shed his "earlier evenhandedness for an ungloved fist"; child advocates were no longer "evenhanded or therapeutic" in their approach to the problem; rather, they single-mindedly sought to enforce "the newly shrill taboos against sex with children."(8) (pp.
The American media once represented an island of sanity, responsibility and evenhandedness in a world otherwise full of Rupert Murdoch tabloidism and political chicanery.
Unnecessary delays should not be tolerated, but there must also be evenhandedness in implementing a program that depends upon mutual trust and cooperation.