eviscerate


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At the same time, Ron Unz, author of the voter-approved proposition that all but banned bilingual education, claims the rules eviscerate parents' rights to have their children taught in English.
Greenwood and Stowe do fine, nuanced work, though Stowe in future interviews might want to likewise eviscerate the people who did her makeup - they've made her wan and simpering.
The absurdly dynamic sound of this Leeds quintet eviscerates a storeroom of prior influences that leap from the squawking improv of John Zorn to briefly calming Buddhist chant, then from Weather Report electric piano fusion to frenetic Frank Zappa collage carnage.
For example, take her heartbreaking "To The Oklahoma Lawmakers: A Poem," which eviscerates the hubris of politicians writing legislation to require women to receive an ultrasound and listen to the baby's heartbeat before an abortion.
Close, who plays Patty Hewes, an attorney who delights in taking down powerful opponents and eviscerates anyone who gets in her way, revealed in an interview that the character was scary.
It eviscerates the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments.
He viciously murders and eviscerates women and at each crime scene leaves a note just for Eve signed by "Jack.
The title of the album, Checks Thugs and Rock 'n Roll, eviscerates the lifestyle-driven mentality that has come to dominate the rap world at the expense of authenticity.
This unprecedented expansion of the federal surveillance of attorney conduct eviscerates state law in the area of corporate governance.
He eviscerates a callow Dana Milbank of The Washingrton Post, who set out to do a hit piece on Nader and couldn't be bothered to stick around to watch him campaign.
There have been real threats to our liberties since September: a USA PATRIOT Act that eviscerates the Fourth Amendment; a roundup of immigrants that's gone far beyond any reasonable protection against terrorism; a renewed impulse toward secrecy in the public sector and against it in our private lives; an airport security regime apparently designed to be as intrusive as possible; a political class calling for citizen snitches, secret tribunals, and a militarized national police force.
On his home turf, the artist has been roundly criticized for eroding high/low boundaries; for the American viewer, however, to ask whether these paintings are cheesy or smart, cynical or generous, is to be caught in a worldview that Murakami cheerfully eviscerates.