References in classic literature ?
From local circumstances, the sea-breeze blows very regularly during the day, and during the night it falls calm: this has given rise to strange exaggerations, for the phenomenon, as described to us at S.
History, however, shows no great progressive movement unaccompanied by exaggerations and extravagances.
The constant struggle between her heart and her principles gave to the least event of her life, so peaceful in appearance, in reality so profoundly agitated, a character of force very superior to the exaggerations of young girls whose manners are early rendered false by the world about them.
Who indulges more recklessly in glowing exaggerations than the lover who hopes, and has not yet obtained He will, like the nightingale, sing with unceasing modulations, display all his talent, untiringly repeat his sweetest notes, until he has what he wants, when his song, like the nightingale's, immediately ceases, never again to be heard.
Everything about him appeared quite normal--there were none of the grotesque exaggerations of his former sleep adventures.
Hideous dreams are exaggerations of the sins of the day.
Oliver's offence having been explained to him, with such exaggerations as the ladies thought best calculated to rouse his ire, he unlocked the cellar-door in a twinkling, and dragged his rebellious apprentice out, by the collar.
It was almost in other voice, and with no trace of his previous exaggeration, that he said, "With pleasure.
Another common piece of exaggeration is that about the "scarcity" of the chamois.
He enjoyed the feeling which he was exciting, and paraded the town serene and happy all day; but the young fellows set a tailor to work that night, and when Tom started out on his parade next morning, he found the old deformed Negro bell ringer straddling along in his wake tricked out in a flamboyant curtain-calico exaggeration of his finery, and imitating his fancy Eastern graces as well as he could.
Tragic as that history seemed to her passionate and undisciplined mind, she told it truthfully and without exaggeration.
So very great is the improvement Time has brought about in such habits, that a moderate statement of the quantity of wine and punch which one man would swallow in the course of a night, without any detriment to his reputation as a perfect gentleman, would seem, in these days, a ridiculous exaggeration.