exorbitance


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(26.) See Nahum Chandler, "Of Exorbitance: The Problem of the Negro as a Problem for Thought," Criticism 50, no.
Before the recession pushed rental rates down from historic highs, 9 West, as the building's address is often abbreviated, was one of the few towers to charge over $200 per square foot for space, an elite mark of exorbitance even at the market's high point in the pricey Plaza District where it is located.
Though Gillies does not pursue the economic aspect of exorbitance in his treatment of Antony and Cleopatra, this aspect does seem essential to the ambiance of the play's Egyptian scenes.
Gail Jones has pointed to the "discursive exorbitance and privilege" (Jones 2004: 159) enjoyed by a brand of theorizing predicated on a form of Derridean "hauntology", which pervades current sensibilities as they become manifest in postmodern approaches to history, reality, representation.
Although the kitschy aesthetic excesses of blaxploitation have served as fertile terrain for parodic prodding since the 1970s--certainly, Shaft and Coffy seem downright sombre when compared to the exaggerative comedic exorbitance of films such as D'Urville Martin's Dolemite (1975) and Greydon Clark's Black Shampoo (1976), which seem to be unabashedly playing for laughs--the genre's tropes have warranted more self-serious cinematic evaluation in recent decades.
For the "exorbitance" which is concomitantly endemic to such
Rather than seeing this crash as a calamity that we will need to find a way out of, Freidman sees it as an awakening to (and from) the unsustainable exorbitance of our former way of life.
What we have witnessed is undoubtedly an inexcusable exorbitance, an excess.
Their grandeur is due to this exorbitance exceeding
(36) According to this view, Faustus's pursuits across the play--his pageant pastimes in the shape of the seven deadly sins; his magnificent flights through the heavens and around the globe; his eldritch jesting with knights and commoners--look like misguided efforts to stuff himself in the absence of any internal or external barometer for gauging "enough." His final request to see Helen in order to "glut the longing of my heart's desire," is the most glorious moment of exorbitance or excess prompted by the impossibility of experiencing satis: "Was this the face that launched a thousand ships / And burned the topless towers of Ilium?" (5.1.93-94).
En apparence, la norme d'equite implique donc une retenue judiciaire beaucoup moins grande que la norme d'inadmissibilite ou d'<< exorbitance >>.
On the "grotesque exorbitance of Biblical allusion" in this scene, and the Professor's possible status as "the giver of life," see O'Brien 382 f.