Expectancy

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Expectancy

A mere hope, based upon no direct provision, promise, or trust. An expectancy is the possibility of receiving a thing, rather than having a vested interest in it.

The term has been applied to situations where an individual hopes and expects to receive something, generally property or money, but has no founded assurance of possession. A person named in a will as an heir has only an expectancy to inherit under the will, since there exists a possibility that the will may be altered so as to disinherit him or her.

expectancy

n. a possibility of future enjoyment of something one counts on receiving, usually referring to real property or the estate of a deceased person, such as a remainder, reversion, or distribution after the death of someone who has use for life. (See: remainder, reversion, distribution)

EXPECTANCY, estates. Having a relation to or dependence upon something future.
     2. Estates are of two sorts, either in possession, sometimes called estates executed; or in expectancy, which are executory. Expectancies are, first, created by the parties, called a remainder; or by act of law, called a reversion.
     3. A bargain in relation to an expectancy is, in general, considered invalid. 2 Ves. 157; Sel. Cas. in Ch. 8; 1 Bro. C. C. 10; Jer. Eq. Jur. 397.

References in periodicals archive ?
Life expectancies are improving any other the Behind the UK's women were the USA (down from 11 weeks to just two), the Netherlands (down from 13 weeks to seven), and Portugal (down from 15 weeks to 10).
Chapter 6, "Generalized expectancies for negative mood regulation: Development, assessment, and implications of a construct" (Salvatore J.
Those with the lowest life expectancies include Angola, the Central African Republic, Chad, Lesotho, Cote D'Ivoire, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Cameroon.
This might be due to the fact that life expectancies of patients at the ends of the spectrum, who are immediately sick or relatively healthy, are easier to assess as they are on more defined paths of well-being, a phenomenon that can be described as a "horizon effect;" however, moderately sick patients tend to occupy a grey zone of well-being and thus their life expectancy becomes a challenge to predict.
Statistics show that women almost always have higher life expectancies than men.
"The mortality ratings generally issued by medical examiners for the impaired lives of this age, sex and smoking status normally would range from 300% down to 150%, which translates to life expectancies between approximately 8.7 years and 11.8 years," Best noted.
Among those who try to sell their life policies, 60% have life expectancies from six to 12 years.</p> <pre> Life Expectancy (LE) % of Insured in LE Category LW<=36 months
In a previous investigation of multiple expectancies, Levy and Earleywine (2003) examined the relations between alcohol use expectancies, studying expectancies, and drinking problems in college students.
The first section reviews the literature on educational expectancies and self-fulfilling prophecies conducted from both teacher and student perspectives within laboratory and classroom settings.
While life expectancies for men and women both rose, men's life expectancy, at 74.4 years was still significantly shorter than the 79.8 years women can expect to live.
The regulations also respond to a provision in the EGTRRA that revised the uniform life expectancy tables to reflect current life expectancies more accurately than tables issued in 1987 (see Exhibit 1).
Results show that students' educational and career outcome expectancies are generally somewhat in flux, which can be expected for a college freshman sample.