exposure

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exposure

noun danger, discovery, exposé, exposition, hazard, jeopardy, laying open, liability, manifestation, openness, perceptibility, peril, presentation, publication, publicity, revelation, risk, susceptibility, susceptivity, unfolding, unmasking, visibility, vulnerability
Associated concepts: exposure to asbestos, exposure to toxic chemical, insurance coverage and exposure
See also: admission, bad repute, detection, disclosure, discovery, expression, impeachment, manifestation, publicity, risk
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of NHANES measured blood PCBs in the general US population and application of SHEDS model to identify key exposure factors.
Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review.
Exposure Factor - Your lens ability to transmit light to the image sensor is reduced in proportion to the magnifying power of teleconverter.
Insurance to Exposure Factors Percentage of Insurance to Exposure Factor 75% or more 1.
It was the same as the common exposure factors for actual soft tissue.
While measuring doses on adult patients, the following parameters were recorded: exposure factors, focus to film distance, and the patient's age, weight and thickness.
The handbook also includes digital radiography information and exposure factors with conversion charts.
Among occupational exposure factors, chromosomal aberrations significantly (P<0.
EPA announced the availability of a final report title, "Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook" (EPA/600/R-06/096F), which was prepared by the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within U.
Although radiographic detection of the sponges on standard antero-posterior projections is difficult because of exposure factors, other confusing linear markers, and metallic densities such as sternal sutures, knowledge of the typical location of a lost sponge and use of lateral radiographic projections may aid in early detection of this rare complication.
Because the Browning Ball is made of foam or sponge, and is essentially the same density as air, no change in exposure factors is necessary and there is no increase in patient dose.