Express

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Express

Clear; definite; explicit; plain; direct; unmistakable; not dubious or ambiguous. Declared in terms; set forth in words. Directly and distinctly stated. Made known distinctly and explicitly, and not left to inference. Manifested by direct and appropriate language, as distinguished from that which is inferred from conduct. The word is usually contrasted with implied.

That which is express is laid out in words, such as an express Warranty, which is an oral or written affirmation from a seller to a buyer of goods that certain standards will be met. Such a warranty may include the promise that any defect which occurs during a certain specified time period will be remedied at the seller's expense. This is distinguishable from an Implied Warranty, which is neither written nor based on any specific oral statement from seller to buyer but is implied through the sale itself. A common example is the implied warranty of merchantability, which implies that an item is fit for the usual purposes for which it was purchased.

Express authority is plainly or distinctly delegated power to an agent by a principal. For example, the owner of a store may expressly give employees the authority to accept deliveries in the owner's name.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

express

adj. direct, unambiguous, distinct language, particularly in a contract, which does not require thought, guessing, inference or implication to determine the meaning.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

EXPRESS. That which is made known, and not left to implication. The opposite of implied. It is a rule, that when a matter or thing is expressed, it ceases to be implied by law: expressum facit cessare tacitum. Co. Litt. 183; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 97.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
At times her fingers played in the matted hair of the dead, and at others they lightly attempted to smooth the painfully expressive muscles of its ghastly visage, as the hand of the mother is seen lingering fondly about the features of her sleeping child.
Philosophy of Expressive Arts Therapy: Poiesis and the Therapeutic Imagination
Summary: Doodle draws on expressive eyes of Indian cinema's 'Tragedy Queen'
On Thursday, Samsung announced via its (https://news.samsung.com/global/ar-emoji-updated-with-18-new-expressive-stickers) online newsroom that it has released an update, which brings 18 new expressive stickers to AR Emoji.
In turn, this recovery of arts and crafts interventions has led to an increased interest in the evidentiary base for the inclusion of expressive art in occupational therapy practice.
(1) Patients who participate in expressive writing also have demonstrated improvements in distress, negative affect, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.
The research published online in the journal Psychophysiology provides the first neural evidence for the benefits of expressive writing, said lead author Hans Schroder, a doctoral student in psychology at Michigan State University (MSU) in the US.
The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of an expressive writing program involving human service students in an undergraduate rehabilitation services course.
The study showed that for each 30-minute increase in hand-held screen time, there was a 49 per cent increased risk of expressive speech delay.
In "Expressive Type" he draws upon his years of experience and expertise to showcase the work of major international designers working with typography in branding and advertising, environment, packaging and products, and self-initiated projects.
H3: Consumers' perceived inner self expressive value of purchasing luxury brands is greater when COB image is favorable.