extenuating circumstances


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Extenuating Circumstances

Facts surrounding the commission of a crime that work to mitigate or lessen it.

Extenuating circumstances render a crime less evil or reprehensible. They do not lower the degree of an offense, although they might reduce the punishment imposed.

Extenuating circumstances might include extraordinary circumstances, which are unusual factors surrounding an event, such as the very young age of a defendant in a murder case.

Cross-references

Mitigating Circumstances.

extenuating circumstances

n. surrounding factors (sometimes called mitigation) which make a crime appear less serious, less aggravated, or without criminal intent, and thus warranting a more lenient punishment or lesser charge (manslaughter rather than murder, for example). (See: mitigating circumstances)

extenuating circumstances

noun alleviating cirrumstances, consideration, exception, extenuation, mitiiating circumstances, mitigation, palliation, palliative cirrumstances, partial excuse, qualification, qualifying reasons, softening circumstances
References in periodicals archive ?
Welsh Lib Dem AM Eluned Parrott added: "While universities generally offer good support and counselling to their students who go through traumatic experiences like these, their policies for extenuating circumstances don't always match that level of support.
She said: "Given the seriousness with which we take this issue, we would be extremely concerned that any student might think that sexual assault would not be grounds for extenuating circumstances.
She stressed that the burden of documenting extenuating circumstances and hardships would remain with mortgage applicants where it always has been.
The judge added: "It is therefore among the most exceptional and extenuating circumstances.
A WELL-KNOWN businessman and former commando has been fined after pleading guilty to charges of illegal possession of firearms, but has been spared a prison sentence due to extenuating circumstances.
While outsiders may have envied Sontag's life of relative privilege, they did not know that her father micromanaged every aspect of her existence by laying down a rigid set of comprehensive rules to which she was expected to adhere, no matter what extenuating circumstances might intervene.
I guess the board may be granting lots of nurses an extension for extenuating circumstances.
For example, your policy might state that you will consider your employee to have voluntarily resigned after three consecutive "no call, no shows," unless there are extenuating circumstances.
Washington established three new theft-related crimes--theft with intent to resell, organized retail theft, and retail theft with extenuating circumstances, such as use of theft devices or leaving through an emergency exit.
Presiding Judge Takeshi Kaneko described the crime itself ''selfish'' and ''leaving no room for extenuating circumstances.
Of course there are sometimes extenuating circumstances as when Villa boss Martin O'Neill took an extended break from the game after leaving Celtic to care for his sick wife.
District officials take into account a student's record, whether it's a first or second offense, and other extenuating circumstances before meting out punishment.