extenuate

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extenuate

to represent an offence or fault as being less serious than it appears, as by showing mitigating circumstances.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) presents such other extenuations that it cannot reasonably be regarded as envisaged by the legislature in forbidding the offense.
See www.mahalo.com 60 soixante saxonite W2 61 soixante et un extenuations W3 62 soixante-deux index W3 expurgatorius 63 soixante-trois extrapositions W3 64 soixante-quatre penta- Penta/ oxyanthraquinones oxyanthraquinones are organic compounds which have been obtained from purpurin and anthrapurpurin.
None of these extenuations changes the fact that he has killed a subordinate and that with the decision of his captain to hold him responsible his career as an officer is over.
Premo EMC introduced its EMI FVDT filters that present high extenuations in 150 kHz up to 30 MHz frequencies, according to the EMC 2004/108/CE directive and specific norm product EN61800-3:2004.
Another of Allen's limp extenuations is that other Catholic organizations, such as Catholic Action, served the Franco regime, too.
Unfortunately for Liverpool, noone's listening to the extenuations any more.
For all of his extenuations, Wolff recognizes that something did go woefully askew with O'Hara and his work.
They would find extenuations. His immersion in the Romantics with their glorification of the impulsive could be cited to good effect.
This section authorizes a court to dismiss a prosecution if, inter alia, the defendant's conduct actually caused or threatened the harm sought to be prevented "to an extent too trivial to warrant the condemnation of conviction" or "presents such other extenuations that it cannot reasonably be regraded as envisaged by the legislature in forbidding the offense." Id.
Socioeconomic and cultural factors influence such decisions, but individual responsibility must outweigh all extenuations that may be derived from the harsh conditions of living in poverty, growing up 'disadvantaged.'